toll
free
(877) 687-7200
Forgot password?
Username: Password:

Archive for the ‘Features’ Category

Where Are The Basic Math Facts?

Monday, June 18th, 2012

eTutor’s curriculum calls for the quick recall of basic facts by children at the end of third grade.  Learning of these skills is done best by teaching students about numbers in relation to everyday life activities and not exclusively by rote drills and memorization.  Their math horizons are expanding to include problem-solving skills, ratio and proportions, algebra, geometry, measurement, data collection, analysis and estimation.  eTutor challenges students to balance a strong knowledge of basic skills with the ability to solve day-to-day math problems with confidence.

It is appropriate for students to struggle once in a while with math problems.  This helps them learn from mistakes, practice persistence and accept challenges.

Numbers and operations on numbers play fundamental roles in helping us make sense of the world around us.  Operations such as addition, subtraction, multiplication and division, as well as the ability to find powers and roots, extend the notion of numbers to create tools to model situations and solve problems in our everyday lives.  Discussing and solving problems related to budgets, comparing prices on merchandise, understanding the nature of interest charges, measuring fuel consumption and calculating the trajectory for space travel would all be impossible without a sense of numbers and numerical operations.  All people must develop this sense of numbers and operations and be able to use it to solve problems using mental computation, paper-and-pencil algorithms, calculators and computers. (from eTutor Goals for Mathematics)

Eight Ideas for Summer Learning

Tuesday, June 12th, 2012

Using the summer months to expand and enhance your child’s skills for learning will benefit your child year round.  Some ideas to get you started might include the following:

  • Select safe, educational toys…such as those that need to be put together.
  • Play games—especially those that have educational value, like number games, guessing games, word games.
  • Encourage your child to do projects with other children.  He/she will learn to cooperate and his/her social skills will improve.
  • Take your child on the train, bus, streetcar or airplane.
  • Listen to your child…encourage him or her to ask questions, discuss ideas and tell stories.
  • Select activities that fit your child’s level of development, ones that he or she can learn from and enjoy.
  • And be sure to set a good example.  If you are interested in learning, your child probably will be, too.  For instance, set a family reading time or some other organized learning activity and share experiences.
  • Learning is a skill and like other skills it improves with practice…so give your child the practice he or she needs to develop learning skills!

A Word About Old Education – Dewey

Thursday, May 17th, 2012

I ran across this in my email this morning and wanted to share it with you:

Dewey (1899) (yes, that would be the 19th Century) wrote
<http://bit.ly/JvR3cG>:  ’I may have exaggerated somewhat in order to
make plain the typical points of the old education: its passivity of
attitude, its mechanical massing of children, its uniformity of
curriculum and method. It may be summed up by stating that the centre
of gravity is outside the child. It is in the teacher, the textbook,
anywhere and everywhere you please except in the immediate instincts
and activities of the child himself.’

We recently went through evaluation for accreditation.  One of the points the evaluators focused on was the compilation of student achievement in order to improve the educational program.   eTutor focuses on the individual student and makes improvements to the instructional program based on individual results.

Many students and parents, as well, view instruction and assessment as competition.  Learning is not a race and should not be viewed as such.  Each child is special and his/her instructional program should be special.  Comparisons between student learning result in a host of problems and issues that extend well beyond the school years.  It seems we have not changed much since the 19th Century.

3 Useful and Fun Online Tools and Resources for Educators

Tuesday, April 24th, 2012

The internet has so much to offer the world of education. With a countless number of tools and resources accessible online, at all hours of the day, and at no cost, it is no wonder so many people praise the internet for its endless contributions to education and learning. While there are numerous articles dedicated to sharing online tools and resources with students, many of us overlook how useful the internet and online resources can be for educators. Teachers too can benefit greatly from easy and instant access to web tools, teacher networks, and various resources online. These three educational web tools and resources hold endless possibilities for educators and teachers at almost any grade level.

Audible

This web tool offers one of the widest selections of digital audiobook available for download online. While this tool may not be applicable to every classroom, many reading and language arts instructors may find assistance from Audible’s services. Though Audible runs at a fee, the services the site provides are extremely useful to the average user and to educators. With an Audible account gain access to a huge collection of digital audiobooks as well as radio shows, podcasts, stand-up comedy, and speeches from cultural, political, and business icons throughout the world. Many studies argue that reading books aloud provides young language learners with a different and more beneficial kind of language and linguistic experience. Teachers can use these audio books during their lessons to help engage students in their literature. The podcasts and famous speeches can also offer worthwhile material for many different classrooms.

Wordle

Wordle is a fun and creative tool for generating “word clouds” from text that you provide. These clouds can be used in many different ways and for many different purposes. They are sure to offer unique and engaging elements to many different lessons in any subject. You can completely customize the word cloud that you create, using various fonts, layouts, and color schemes. Wordle will give greater prominence to words that appear more frequently in the text that you provide. This can offer great insight into literary analysis of almost any text, selection, prose, or poem. This fun tool is free to use and applicable to various different creative arenas within the classroom.

ReadWriteThink

This online resource seeks to provide educators, parents, and afterschool professionals with access to some of the highest quality practices in reading and language arts instruction by offering free materials and guidance. The ReadWriteThink website is a partner of the International Reading Association and the National Council for Teachers of English. With a troupe of dedicated and intelligent advisors and authors, the ReadWriteThink community has a lot to offer. The site offers classroom resources, including lesson plans, student interactives, calendar activities, and printouts. Providing educators with professional development tools such as strategy guides, a professional library, news about meetings and events, and online e-workshops on professional development and pathways for advancing adolescent literacy, ReadWriteThink is an extremely useful resource for teachers from all backgrounds and at all levels. The site even offers resources for parents and afterschool administrators, concerning each grade kindergarten through 12th grade.

By-line:

This guest post is contributed by Katheryn Rivas, who writes for online universities blog.  She welcomes your comments at her email Id: katherynrivas87@gmail.com.

Mutual Trust Starts With Total Honesty

Thursday, April 12th, 2012

A judge in a large mid-western city was describing the causes of juvenile delinquency speaking from personal experience with thousands of young people: “Children want to be honest. They do not want to cheat.  They look to their parents and teacher to teach them honesty. They are confused, letdown, and disappointed when they hear one parent on the telephone saying the other parent is not at home.  But they are both in the living room watching television,  it is these little white lies that tear down the trust and confidence children want to have in their parents.  Children cannot tell the difference between little dishonesty and big dishonesty.” Can anyone? Don’t you have a feeling of insecurity in someone you know does not respect absolute truthfulness and honesty?

Mutual trust starts with your total honesty, even at your expense.  No exaggerations, no cover-ups, no distortions, no little white lies…just complete honesty.  It is a contagious characteristic that will spread to others.

Time – A Daily Miracle

Monday, April 2nd, 2012

You wake up in the morning, and lo! your purse is magically filled with twenty-four hours of the unmanufactured tissue of the universe of your life!  It is yours.  It is the most precious of possessions…No one can take it from you.  An no one receives either more or less than you receive.

You have to live on this twenty-four hours of daily time.  Out of it you have to spin health, pleasure, money, content, respect, and the evolution of your immortal soul.  Its right use, its most effective use, is a matter of the highest urgency and of the most thrilling actuality.  All depends on that.  Your happiness…the elusive prize that you are all clutching for, my friends!…depends on that.

Time is the inexplicable raw material of everything.  With it, all it possible, without it, nothing.  The supply of time is truly a daily miracle, an affair genuinely astonishing when one examines it.  If one cannot arrange that an income of twenty-four hours a day shall exactly cover all proper items of expenditure, one does muddle one’s whole life indefinitely…

Single File – One Moment at a Time

Thursday, March 29th, 2012

We never shall have any more time.  We have, and we have always had, all the time there is.

- Arnold Bennett

Most of us think of ourselves as standing, wearily and helplessly at the center of a circle bristling with tasks, burdens, problems, annoyances, and responsibilities which are rushing in upon us.  At every moment we have a dozen different things to do, a dozen problems to solve, a dozen strains to endure.  We see ourselves as over-driven, overburdened, overtired.

This is a common mental picture…and it is totally false.  No one of us, however crowded his life, has such an existence,  even of a super-busy day.  The crowded hours come to you always one moment at a time.  That is the only way they can come.  The day may bring many tasks, many problems, strains, but invariably they come in single file.

The Power of Expectations

Tuesday, March 27th, 2012

The effect of one person’s expectations on the behavior of another is another instance of the power of attitudes. People are always communicating their thoughts in a variety of subtle ways.  And others are responding…positively, negatively or passively.  Strong, positive attitudes about one’s self and others bring out the best in others; cause positive responses that accelerate growth and learning.

See all others as the potential vessels of your own treasured knowledge and ability, be willing to share yourself in a tolerant, loving manner, and your effort will be richly rewarded by the growth of those around you.

Virtual Learning Takes A Boat Ride

Thursday, February 16th, 2012

It was early summer when Mrs. Blakely called to talk with me about her son, Jared.  They had subscribed to eTutor Virtual Learning Program over the winter months.  Jared was the computer expert in the family and enjoyed studying over the Internet.

Mrs. Blakely and her family lived on a small island in Washington State.  On this day she was looking at the geese and goats in her yard as Jared got in his rowboat for the short distance to the mainland.  With warmer weather he chose to go to the library to access eTutor from the computers there.  The access was faster and he was showing others at the library about the program.

Jared is not unlike other students from around the world who are using eTutor as part of their learning experience.  The virtual learning program has over 3200 lessons in the four major curricular areas of English language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies.

Jared logs on whenever he wants to, in order to study, while other students have a set time to log on each day.  Each lesson has nine parts and takes between 45 minutes to an hour to complete.  The extended learning section can increase the time to complete a lesson.

Mrs. Blakely checks Jared’s student portfolio each day to see what lessons he has completed and how he has don on the quizzes and exams.  “It has been hard to get Jared to focus on studying, but he loves logging on to eTutor.  He finally is enjoying learning!”

Twelve Tips to Encourage Reading at Home

Monday, February 13th, 2012


Learning to read is much like learning any other skill. It requires a combination of instruction, experimentation, and practice. But the first step must be motivation. The child must want to learn to read. Parents can encourage their children to read  by demonstrating that they think reading  is important. Parents can help their
children discover the benefits of reading:
new ideas…relaxation…adventure…fun.

  • Buy as many children’s books as you can afford.
  • Give books as gifts.
  • Visit the library regularly.
  • Allow your children to choose their own books.  Don’t rush them.
  • Show your children that you enjoy reading. Make sure they see you reading newspapers, magazines, and books.
  • Set up a special place for reading.
  • Encourage older children to read to younger children.
  • Surround your child with words; point out street signs; label objects in the house such as table, desk, and stove.
  • Play word games like Scrabble, Anagrams, and Ad Lib.
  • Watch educational TV programs together. Some stress reading development.
  • Read to your child, especially at bedtime. Reread favorite stories.
  • Ask you child to read to you.

Stress the things your children do well in reading rather than any mistakes they make. Remember: Success breeds success.