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Posts Tagged ‘gifted’

Six Ways to Increase Oral Reading Skills

Thursday, May 24th, 2012

When reading orally, children must not only decode the printed words on a page, they must also communicate the author’s meaning to others by varying the voice volume, pitch, phrasing, pauses, tone and reading rate.  When reading orally, children must understand what they are reading in order to communicate the meaning successfully.  As a result, the regular practice of oral reading boosts children’s comprehension, producing gains that will transfer to their silent, independent reading of fiction or nonfiction.

Activities to increase oral reading skills:

  1. Reading Specific Sentences Aloud. Have your child read a passage silently.  Ask questions and direct him/her to locate and read the sentence that has the answer.
  2. Multimedia Models. Play records and tape recordings of poetry, prose and plays.  Encourage discussion of  the way the speakers use their voices to convey meaning.
  3. Reading Duets. Have your child choose a reading partner.  Alternate the partners as readers and listeners.
  4. One Minute or Less Oral Reading Fun. Provide daily opportunities for your child to read orally, such as reading notices, signs or advertisements.
  5. Choral Reading and Play-Reading. Select poems, dramatic scenes from stories or story description to rehearse for choral readings.  Model the chosen selection.  Have your child choose a part to practice reading orally.
  6. Recording Oral Reading. Tape or video record plays, choral readings or radio dramas that your child has prepared and practiced.

Gifted and Talented

Monday, May 21st, 2012

Although we place high hopes for a worthwhile future on the gifted and talented youth of today, we often neglect this group.  Many gifted children are left to their own devices in school as well as at home.

Contrary to the popular misconceptions that they will do better without interference and that they will succeed on their own, some gifted children experience academic, social, and personal problems when they do not receive support from society and parents.  Gifted children display their abilities in a variety of ways, each unique to the individual child.  In general, for most children, giftedness is demonstrated by performance of tasks and understanding of concepts usually associated with much older children.  Reading signs, magazines, and books, and performing mathematical computations at ages three to five; speaking complete sentences and using abstract vocabulary at age two and three….all indicate superior intellectual abilities.

Often the gifted child feels isolated from the rest of the world because of the exceptional abilities he or she possesses.  Facing these feelings of difference alone can create emotional problems, disruptive behaviors, or withdrawal from the frustrating situation.  Parents play an important role in the development of exceptional abilities in children, especially in encouraging a favorable attitude toward these tendencies.

Because of their heightened perceptions and sensitivities, many gifted children need an environment that is secure emotionally and stimulating intellectually to allow their abilities to flourish.  Too many adults overlook their needs, however, assuming that these children already have advantages other lack.  Consequently, much is left to parents to provide for the gifted.  Working with the child and with other parents, they can accomplish this awesome, often frustrating, task.

The Online Curriculum

Monday, April 9th, 2012
The eTutor curriculum meets National Goals for Learning in Language Arts, Mathematics, Science and Social Studies, including twenty-three subjects. It is designed for students from kindergarten through grade twelve and can be adapted for the adult learner.

eTutor provides age appropriate lesson modules which teach ways to understand more difficult concepts. When the student approaches a more difficult problem, perhaps in Physics, Economics or Politics, they may recall earlier learning that can provide a way to solve such a problem. Often students have difficulty linking previous learning to newer concepts.

The eTutor curriculum is a continuum that begins in the early years and progresses through a life time. While there is much overlap in subjects, we find it helpful to know that the simple task for the young learner of pushing a truck up a ramp (inclined plane) is a basic concept of physics that he will revisit many times in his educational experience. Although our students may find the words physics, economics and politics hard to know and understand, we as educators must be aware that these are subjects to be included in any well rounded curriculum. We want students to have a solid foundation in all subjects in order to meet success in their later learning experiences.

In Physics for example – simple machines teach about principals of physics.

In Economics – most young children play store and, the boys especially, like to play with trucks. Transportation fits int Economics, as does going to the store.

Politics – The idea of choice is not new to our young learners and although we might not call it politics, the idea that they might choose one pet over another or one friend out of many, is an example of politics Our young children vote every day on things in their every day life.

As the student progresses through the eTutor curriculum the courses required may be somewhat different than what they would experience in a regular public or private school. Subjects are integrated across the curricular area. For instance, Algebra is often labeled “pre-Algebra,” “Algebra” or “Algebra I and II”, or “Advanced Algebra”. In the eTutor curriculum, algebraic concepts are taught throughout the subjects, Computation, Estimation, Data Analysis, Measurement, Ratio and Percentage, and Geometry. eTutor recommends Algebra at the eleventh grade, as the course covers the basics to calculus.

Curriculum Development

Knowledge Headquarters has developed a unique and innovative model for creating the e-Tutor educational content. The company launched LessonPro in 1999 as a new and promising application for writing online K-12 educational coursework. The purpose of the web site is to promote the highest standards for Internet-based instructional content to the educational community. Teachers from across the nation write lesson modules using the LessonPro template. Only those lesson modules that meet the standards of excellence for eTutor are used in the Program. The result of this innovative approach to curriculum development is a curriculum that is rich and varied, where each lesson module has its own voice.

Curriculuar Areas
Language Arts

English reading, writing, listening, and literature

Math

Algebra, Geometry, Pre-Calculus

Science

Physical Sciences

Social Studies

Broad range of “humanities” subjects

Accreditation

What accreditation is and how it benefits you.

Two Programs:

Access all eTutor lesson modules, quizzes, and more.

The independent program plus a personal tutor. Expanded access to lesson modules.

Three Features Identify Outstanding Online Learning

Friday, August 5th, 2011

All online courses of study should be accredited and designed according to national and state standards.  Content will include:

  • Technology-based curriculum activities to enliven and enrich learning
  • Online communication, collaboration and reference tools
  • Community-based activities

The outstanding online instructional program will deliver broad, engaging curriculum content in major curricular areas that include many different subjects.  Subscribers will have access to all curricular areas at their level. Each time a student enters the program he will choose the curricular area he wishes to study:  Language Arts, Mathematics, Science or Social Science.   Within the curricular area the student will select subjects based on a recommended course of study.

No plug-ins, software or additional components will be needed.  Teachers from across the United States will be able to create the interactive instructional modules.  The amount of instructional material will be increased regularly.  Instructional modules will be aligned to state and national goals and standards in the four core curriculum areas.  The program will be fully accessible through the Internet,  with no peripherals or ancillary material, allowing registered users to access the program from any location.

Homeschooling

Thursday, June 25th, 2009

We have many friends and associates who are homeschooling their children. Although we value public schooling, we also place value in the need to have alternatives. Parents can then choose the most appropriate learning approach for their child or children.

The number of homeschoolers is bigger than the nation’s largest public school system in New York City and may be as high as approximately 2.2 million. The number of homeschoolers is difficult to quantify, because there is no clear definition of what is ‘homeschooling.’ We believe that homeschooling embraces any student who participates in consistent learning activities in the home. So, that could mean a student who completes a full curriculum at home or one who does supplemental instructional work at home. In other words, any student who participates in a course of study on a regular and consistent basis at home is a homeschooled students. Before we can count these children, we all need to agree on what homeschooling means.

Although critics of homeschool argue that it can’t replace the social and educational tools offered in traditional schools, Patricia Lines, a senior research analyst for the U.S. Department of Education argues homeschooling is instead “reinventing the idea of school.” Homeschoolers use tools such as the Internet and educational software to provide new avenues of learning. Homeschooling can provide a wealth of opportunities for all students including those with special needs such as gifted or learning disabled students.