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Posts Tagged ‘online credit recovery’

Learning the eTutor Way!

Wednesday, May 22nd, 2013

eTutor lesson modules are grouped at Primary (about K-3), Intermediate (about 4-5), Middle/Junior High (about 6-8) and High School.  This cross-aging of lesson modules has been very successful for eTutor students as they can work at their own pace.  Some lesson modules may be easier and can be used for review and some will be more challenging. Students should do no more than four lesson modules each day.  We recommend one lesson module in each of the four major curricular areas.  One lesson module a day is sufficient for those who use eTutor for supplemental work or credit recovery. All curricular areas support one another.

Lesson modules take from one hour to one and a half hours to complete. Some may even take several days to complete.  The default for passing quizzes and exams is set at eighty percent.  Students are expected to fully complete lesson modules.  Parents or another adult are asked to review the finished Activities and Extended Learning with each lesson module since these are most often completed off line.  They can be used as a springboard for discussion, ‘What did you learn by completing this,” “How could you have done this differently,”  ”Explain this concept to me,” etc.

There is much reading and writing in the eTutor program and users will haveexcellent reading and writing skills if the program is used consistently. We suggest the student respond in writing to the Problem Statement before and after completing each lesson module to act as a self-check. The vocabulary words can be used for writing sentences or creating word puzzles.  Students should write a short description of each of the resource links.   eTutor is a Pass/Fail program.  Completed lessons are reflective of those where the student has successfully completed Quizzes and Exams.  Students are expected to spend approximately four to five hours studying each day when using eTutor for their full curriculum.   We suggest that the student keep track of his hours of study each day on a piece of paper or a calendar.


Imagine It!

Monday, May 20th, 2013

The part of your mind that plays the greatest role in achieving the things that you want from life is that part of your mind that imagines.  It is a strange fact, in view of this, that this part of your mind is the one that is developed and controlled the least.  You spend years developing the part of your mind that stores knowledge, reasons, analyzes, judges, memorizes, and learns but almost no time in developing the immense power of your imagination.  Here are some interesting facts about this enormous personal power and the benefits you will receive by tapping its potential.

Fact No. 1:  Your imagination affects your emotions.  Scientists have discovered there is a kind of “hot line” running from the part of the mind that imagines to the part of the mind that controls your emotions.  This explains why you can imagine yourself in a frightening situation and actually get emotionally upset.  It is simply because your imagination is sending pictures directly to your emotional control center which, in turn, affects the feelings and functions of the body.

Fact No. 2:  Your imagination is more apt to act destructively rather than constructively unless managed by you.  All of your problems in living are rooted in your imagination. It is the imagination acting negatively that becomes congested by fear, doubt, worry, and makes you feel inferior, unhappy, and depressed.  It even keeps you from getting along with others and is the breeding place for jealousy, envy, suspicion and hate.  Letting your imagination run wild can be one of the most destructive forces in your life.

Fact No. 3:   The untapped power of your imagination is almost unlimited. Psychologists say that, at the very most, people use only 10% to 20% of their mental potential.  They must certainly be referring to the imagination.  Your imagination is a rich source of ideas, mental pictures, and dormant forces that yu can use to develo9p0 your life into abundance and happiness.



Summer School Offers Critical Thinking – Problem Solving Activities + Extended Learning

Monday, May 6th, 2013

When it’s time to go beyond learning facts and to get into the grayer matter of a topic or skill, your student is ready for an inquiry activity that presents the student with a challenging task, provides access to online resources and scaffolds the learning process to prompt higher order thinking. The best online learning programs include both an activity and extended learning section. These are an important part of learning. Students will not fully comprehend the concept or skill being taught unless they can apply critical thinking and problem solving skill.

Activities:

These can include a worksheet, hands-on activity, project, problems, questions or sites relevant to the study guide. This is a chance for students to apply what they have learned.  e-Tutor does not grade or evaluate activities, but encourages tutors to review these with their students. They should be used as a springboard for discussion.  Questions asked of the student might be:  “What did you learn by doing this?”  “How could you have done this differently?”  “Explain this concept to me.”

Extended Learning:

This might consist of a critical thinking project, problem or discussion that goes beyond the scope of the lesson. e-Tutor does not grade or evaluate extended learning activities.   Rather, these are used to frame a discussion between the student, parent and tutor. We suggest that both Activity and Extended Learning  activities be kept in folders, one for each of the main curricular areas: Language Arts, Mathematics, Science and Social Studies.

Students begin by learning background knowledge presented in the Study Guide, they are then given a specific task to complete. They synthesize their learning by presenting their interpretation of the Activity and Extended Learning to a parent or another adult..

Anything that requires evaluation or scientific hypothesizing will evoke a variety of interpretations. The reason the e-Tutor Activities and Extended Learning are so critical to the lesson is because they offer the breadth of perspectives and viewpoints that are usually needed to construct meaning on complex topics. Students benefit from completing these sections of each lesson so that they can explore and make sense of the concepts or skills introduced in the Study Guide.

Students are encouraged to keep track of the time they spend learning. They can jot down the time they start to study and the time they finish on a piece of paper or a calendar. Make sure and include time spent in physical development and the arts.

Tutors will quickly know which areas their students are struggling in and which topics they favor by frequently checking their portfolios. You might need to make recommendations to your students about trying new subjects or topics. New lesson modules are added frequently.

Credit Recovery – Guides and Directs Student Learning

Sunday, May 5th, 2013

e-Tutor students say that online credit recovery courses have characteristics their teachers do not offer.  The online program is always available.  The program has a “patient” character and is nonjudgmental.  e-Tutor allows students to be anonymous and allows them to do many things at the same time.  e-Tutor aligns online information to the student’s learning program.

Tutors are all teachers who have been trained in online learning.  Tutors are available at times that are convenient for both student and tutor.

e-Tutor Credit Recovery Program includes Online Tutoring

  • Effective one-to-one learning
  • Direct contact with your tutor a minimum of one hour each week
  • ‘Talk” to your tutor 24/7 via email
  • Includes expanded access to e-Tutor lesson modules
  • Tutors emphasize skill building and reinforcement of concepts
  • Assignments aligned to e-Tutor lesson modules
  • Online communication and completion of assignments through the e-Tutor bulletin board/chat room
  • Parents have access to and can view assignments and tutor comments and grades

Plus: All of the features from the Regular eTutor Independent Study Program

  • Complete K-12 accredited curriculum
  • Interactive online lesson modules
  • Access from anywhere, at any time:
    All you need is a web browser
  • Special parent login allows progress tracking and report card generation
  • Automatically graded quizzes and exams

Almost?

Monday, March 11th, 2013

Special Help in Test Taking

Tuesday, February 26th, 2013

Many students will soon be preparing for those annual tests that have become so much a part of the public school experience.  Different types of tests are tackled in different ways.  It is important for your child to recognize what kind of test it is and plan the right strategy.   Here are some special helps for your child to remember:

  • In a true/false test
    Everything in the statement must be true for the correct answer to be “true.”
    Watch for key words.  Always, never and only frequently point to a false answer.

    Sometimes, usually and typically tend to point to a true answer.

  • On a matching test
    Check first to see if you can use an answer more than once.  If not, be sure to mark off the answers as you use them.
  • On a multiple choice test
    Watch for qualifying phrases which can change the meaning such as:  the only, the last, which one is not an example of.
  • On an essay test
    Prepare for essay tests ahead of time by thinking of essay questions which might appear on the test.
  • Organize relevant information from the text that answers these questions.
  • Write out actual answers to your questions using as much detail as possible.
  • If your answers aren’t satisfactory, begin again.check.gif (1162 bytes)

Be sure you answer the specific question that is being asked.

Test Anxiety

Wednesday, February 20th, 2013

Spring traditionally signals test-taking time in many parts of the United States. Research shows that being “test wise” improves a student’s scores. To help your child become more comfortable with test taking:

  • Talk about the tests ahead of time with your child.
  • Build your child’s confidence through study and practice at home.
  • Show a positive attitude toward taking tests.

Tell you child:I know you will do the best you can, or

The world won’t end if you are not number one.

  • Encourage your child to listen carefully to spoken test instructions. You can provide practice by giving simple, then gradually more complex, instructions for things to be done at home.

The Online Curriculum

Monday, April 9th, 2012
The eTutor curriculum meets National Goals for Learning in Language Arts, Mathematics, Science and Social Studies, including twenty-three subjects. It is designed for students from kindergarten through grade twelve and can be adapted for the adult learner.

eTutor provides age appropriate lesson modules which teach ways to understand more difficult concepts. When the student approaches a more difficult problem, perhaps in Physics, Economics or Politics, they may recall earlier learning that can provide a way to solve such a problem. Often students have difficulty linking previous learning to newer concepts.

The eTutor curriculum is a continuum that begins in the early years and progresses through a life time. While there is much overlap in subjects, we find it helpful to know that the simple task for the young learner of pushing a truck up a ramp (inclined plane) is a basic concept of physics that he will revisit many times in his educational experience. Although our students may find the words physics, economics and politics hard to know and understand, we as educators must be aware that these are subjects to be included in any well rounded curriculum. We want students to have a solid foundation in all subjects in order to meet success in their later learning experiences.

In Physics for example – simple machines teach about principals of physics.

In Economics – most young children play store and, the boys especially, like to play with trucks. Transportation fits int Economics, as does going to the store.

Politics – The idea of choice is not new to our young learners and although we might not call it politics, the idea that they might choose one pet over another or one friend out of many, is an example of politics Our young children vote every day on things in their every day life.

As the student progresses through the eTutor curriculum the courses required may be somewhat different than what they would experience in a regular public or private school. Subjects are integrated across the curricular area. For instance, Algebra is often labeled “pre-Algebra,” “Algebra” or “Algebra I and II”, or “Advanced Algebra”. In the eTutor curriculum, algebraic concepts are taught throughout the subjects, Computation, Estimation, Data Analysis, Measurement, Ratio and Percentage, and Geometry. eTutor recommends Algebra at the eleventh grade, as the course covers the basics to calculus.

Curriculum Development

Knowledge Headquarters has developed a unique and innovative model for creating the e-Tutor educational content. The company launched LessonPro in 1999 as a new and promising application for writing online K-12 educational coursework. The purpose of the web site is to promote the highest standards for Internet-based instructional content to the educational community. Teachers from across the nation write lesson modules using the LessonPro template. Only those lesson modules that meet the standards of excellence for eTutor are used in the Program. The result of this innovative approach to curriculum development is a curriculum that is rich and varied, where each lesson module has its own voice.

Curriculuar Areas
Language Arts

English reading, writing, listening, and literature

Math

Algebra, Geometry, Pre-Calculus

Science

Physical Sciences

Social Studies

Broad range of “humanities” subjects

Accreditation

What accreditation is and how it benefits you.

Two Programs:

Access all eTutor lesson modules, quizzes, and more.

The independent program plus a personal tutor. Expanded access to lesson modules.

Six Steps Online Students Need to Follow

Thursday, June 16th, 2011

Online learning is gaining acceptance in school districts around the country.  However,  school districts want to know students are actually spending their time learning.  When asked about your online learning program,  if your student has taken the following steps, you will have evidence of a very strong program.

  1. Plan to spend approximately five hours learning each day.
  2. Keep track of when you start to study and when you stop each day.  Keep record of sport and art activity on your list, as well.
  3. Have a notebook, pencil, paper and any other necessary materials available before starting online learning each day.
  4. Establish a schedule for learning and start, as much as possible, the same time each day.
  5. Share with your parents or another adult the goals and time management plan you have established for yourself.
  6. Keep a record of activities, assignments, and testing completed. Include examples when possible.