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Posts Tagged ‘online summer school’

Imagine It!

Monday, May 20th, 2013

The part of your mind that plays the greatest role in achieving the things that you want from life is that part of your mind that imagines.  It is a strange fact, in view of this, that this part of your mind is the one that is developed and controlled the least.  You spend years developing the part of your mind that stores knowledge, reasons, analyzes, judges, memorizes, and learns but almost no time in developing the immense power of your imagination.  Here are some interesting facts about this enormous personal power and the benefits you will receive by tapping its potential.

Fact No. 1:  Your imagination affects your emotions.  Scientists have discovered there is a kind of “hot line” running from the part of the mind that imagines to the part of the mind that controls your emotions.  This explains why you can imagine yourself in a frightening situation and actually get emotionally upset.  It is simply because your imagination is sending pictures directly to your emotional control center which, in turn, affects the feelings and functions of the body.

Fact No. 2:  Your imagination is more apt to act destructively rather than constructively unless managed by you.  All of your problems in living are rooted in your imagination. It is the imagination acting negatively that becomes congested by fear, doubt, worry, and makes you feel inferior, unhappy, and depressed.  It even keeps you from getting along with others and is the breeding place for jealousy, envy, suspicion and hate.  Letting your imagination run wild can be one of the most destructive forces in your life.

Fact No. 3:   The untapped power of your imagination is almost unlimited. Psychologists say that, at the very most, people use only 10% to 20% of their mental potential.  They must certainly be referring to the imagination.  Your imagination is a rich source of ideas, mental pictures, and dormant forces that yu can use to develo9p0 your life into abundance and happiness.



Traveling With Math

Friday, May 17th, 2013

Will you be traveling this summer?  Here are a few math activities that you can do with your child…

  1. Discuss directions (north, south, east, and west) to give your child a sense of coordinates.  Use street maps to find travel routes and addresses.  Have your child estimate the time of your arrival and compare that to the actual time it took to arrive at a given destination.
  2. Have competitions when traveling.  Count red cars or see who can find the largest number formed by the numerals on a license plate.
  3. Have your child practice record and read the large number on license plates viewed.  Find the largest number in a given time period of travel.
  4. Estimate, then time how long before a street light changes.  Estimate, then count how many stores are in a block.
  5. Point out speed limits and distances between towns.  Talk about the time it takes to get from one town to another when you drive at different speeds.
  6. Have your child check the odometer in the car to determine distances on a trip….starting point and ending destination.
  7. Find the differences between certain distances traveled.  Find out how much farther you traveled on the first day than you did on the second day.
  8. Practice reading the numbers on the odometer.


Summer Activities

Tuesday, July 10th, 2012

While the following suggestions for family summer activities might seem obvious…..some of us need a gentle reminder once in awhile.

Encourage your children to join a community youth group
Visit the library with your child
Get your child a library card. It is a great gift
Check telephone listings for agencies and community groups that offer free parent and child materials. Don’t forget to check the Internet for these resources.
Take advantage of public recreation
Take nature hikes
Visit museums, zoos, and parks
Take your child to plays and concerts
When traveling with your children in a car or bus, discuss the sights you see along the way.

Eight Ideas for Summer Learning

Tuesday, June 12th, 2012

Using the summer months to expand and enhance your child’s skills for learning will benefit your child year round.  Some ideas to get you started might include the following:

  • Select safe, educational toys…such as those that need to be put together.
  • Play games—especially those that have educational value, like number games, guessing games, word games.
  • Encourage your child to do projects with other children.  He/she will learn to cooperate and his/her social skills will improve.
  • Take your child on the train, bus, streetcar or airplane.
  • Listen to your child…encourage him or her to ask questions, discuss ideas and tell stories.
  • Select activities that fit your child’s level of development, ones that he or she can learn from and enjoy.
  • And be sure to set a good example.  If you are interested in learning, your child probably will be, too.  For instance, set a family reading time or some other organized learning activity and share experiences.
  • Learning is a skill and like other skills it improves with practice…so give your child the practice he or she needs to develop learning skills!

Gifted and Talented

Monday, May 21st, 2012

Although we place high hopes for a worthwhile future on the gifted and talented youth of today, we often neglect this group.  Many gifted children are left to their own devices in school as well as at home.

Contrary to the popular misconceptions that they will do better without interference and that they will succeed on their own, some gifted children experience academic, social, and personal problems when they do not receive support from society and parents.  Gifted children display their abilities in a variety of ways, each unique to the individual child.  In general, for most children, giftedness is demonstrated by performance of tasks and understanding of concepts usually associated with much older children.  Reading signs, magazines, and books, and performing mathematical computations at ages three to five; speaking complete sentences and using abstract vocabulary at age two and three….all indicate superior intellectual abilities.

Often the gifted child feels isolated from the rest of the world because of the exceptional abilities he or she possesses.  Facing these feelings of difference alone can create emotional problems, disruptive behaviors, or withdrawal from the frustrating situation.  Parents play an important role in the development of exceptional abilities in children, especially in encouraging a favorable attitude toward these tendencies.

Because of their heightened perceptions and sensitivities, many gifted children need an environment that is secure emotionally and stimulating intellectually to allow their abilities to flourish.  Too many adults overlook their needs, however, assuming that these children already have advantages other lack.  Consequently, much is left to parents to provide for the gifted.  Working with the child and with other parents, they can accomplish this awesome, often frustrating, task.

The Online Curriculum

Monday, April 9th, 2012
The eTutor curriculum meets National Goals for Learning in Language Arts, Mathematics, Science and Social Studies, including twenty-three subjects. It is designed for students from kindergarten through grade twelve and can be adapted for the adult learner.

eTutor provides age appropriate lesson modules which teach ways to understand more difficult concepts. When the student approaches a more difficult problem, perhaps in Physics, Economics or Politics, they may recall earlier learning that can provide a way to solve such a problem. Often students have difficulty linking previous learning to newer concepts.

The eTutor curriculum is a continuum that begins in the early years and progresses through a life time. While there is much overlap in subjects, we find it helpful to know that the simple task for the young learner of pushing a truck up a ramp (inclined plane) is a basic concept of physics that he will revisit many times in his educational experience. Although our students may find the words physics, economics and politics hard to know and understand, we as educators must be aware that these are subjects to be included in any well rounded curriculum. We want students to have a solid foundation in all subjects in order to meet success in their later learning experiences.

In Physics for example – simple machines teach about principals of physics.

In Economics – most young children play store and, the boys especially, like to play with trucks. Transportation fits int Economics, as does going to the store.

Politics – The idea of choice is not new to our young learners and although we might not call it politics, the idea that they might choose one pet over another or one friend out of many, is an example of politics Our young children vote every day on things in their every day life.

As the student progresses through the eTutor curriculum the courses required may be somewhat different than what they would experience in a regular public or private school. Subjects are integrated across the curricular area. For instance, Algebra is often labeled “pre-Algebra,” “Algebra” or “Algebra I and II”, or “Advanced Algebra”. In the eTutor curriculum, algebraic concepts are taught throughout the subjects, Computation, Estimation, Data Analysis, Measurement, Ratio and Percentage, and Geometry. eTutor recommends Algebra at the eleventh grade, as the course covers the basics to calculus.

Curriculum Development

Knowledge Headquarters has developed a unique and innovative model for creating the e-Tutor educational content. The company launched LessonPro in 1999 as a new and promising application for writing online K-12 educational coursework. The purpose of the web site is to promote the highest standards for Internet-based instructional content to the educational community. Teachers from across the nation write lesson modules using the LessonPro template. Only those lesson modules that meet the standards of excellence for eTutor are used in the Program. The result of this innovative approach to curriculum development is a curriculum that is rich and varied, where each lesson module has its own voice.

Curriculuar Areas
Language Arts

English reading, writing, listening, and literature

Math

Algebra, Geometry, Pre-Calculus

Science

Physical Sciences

Social Studies

Broad range of “humanities” subjects

Accreditation

What accreditation is and how it benefits you.

Two Programs:

Access all eTutor lesson modules, quizzes, and more.

The independent program plus a personal tutor. Expanded access to lesson modules.

The Power of Expectations

Tuesday, March 27th, 2012

The effect of one person’s expectations on the behavior of another is another instance of the power of attitudes. People are always communicating their thoughts in a variety of subtle ways.  And others are responding…positively, negatively or passively.  Strong, positive attitudes about one’s self and others bring out the best in others; cause positive responses that accelerate growth and learning.

See all others as the potential vessels of your own treasured knowledge and ability, be willing to share yourself in a tolerant, loving manner, and your effort will be richly rewarded by the growth of those around you.

Six Steps Online Students Need to Follow

Thursday, June 16th, 2011

Online learning is gaining acceptance in school districts around the country.  However,  school districts want to know students are actually spending their time learning.  When asked about your online learning program,  if your student has taken the following steps, you will have evidence of a very strong program.

  1. Plan to spend approximately five hours learning each day.
  2. Keep track of when you start to study and when you stop each day.  Keep record of sport and art activity on your list, as well.
  3. Have a notebook, pencil, paper and any other necessary materials available before starting online learning each day.
  4. Establish a schedule for learning and start, as much as possible, the same time each day.
  5. Share with your parents or another adult the goals and time management plan you have established for yourself.
  6. Keep a record of activities, assignments, and testing completed. Include examples when possible.