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Posts Tagged ‘transition’

Competition

Friday, September 20th, 2013
With the beginning of school, comes another season of sports of all kinds for our youngsters. We have come to believe that competition is good for us. But research show that “offensive competition.” which involves aggressive gamesmanship, can be counterproductive. A study conducted at the University of Texas disclosed that people who were more concerned with winning than with performing well had lower levels of achievement. If you are competitive or your child is competitive, consider the following:
  • Keep in mind that competition is not the opposite of cooperation. Using cooperative strategies will often help one be more “competitive.”
  • Learn to believe in yourself. Do not strive to prove yourself in others’ eyes.
  • Accept that other people are needed to get ahead. A combination of healthy competition and cooperation can go a long way.
  • Keep an open mind to new ideas, information and feedback. Offensively competitive people often resist others’ suggestions.
  • Help others to achieve their goals.
Dr. Stan J. Katz and Aimee E. Liu

The Cost of Keeping the Status Quo

Thursday, May 2nd, 2013

Decision-makers frequently underestimate the costs of doing nothing, of maintaining the status quo. The price of not changing is often less obvious and harder to quantify than the expense of change.  In an ideal world, improvement and new opportunity decisions are made on a rational basis: cost effectiveness – monetary and human. Accurate estimates of costs and benefits for each proposed alternative must be calculated. The costs are relatively easy to isolate.

But what about the alternative that doesn’t involve change, the status quo option? Underestimated costs of doing nothing include downtime, clinging to outgrown systems, incompatible mixes of old and new programs and procedures, or using outdated procedures.  An apt description of our educational system.

The demands on education have increased greatly in recent years. Student populations have changed, and community complexity has increased. Instead of adopting new methods and procedures, some organizations stretch their old systems to accommodate the change they have experienced. Eventually the organization slows down, becomes less efficient or effective, and gives poor service. The costs are public dissatisfaction, more complaints and pressure for privatization.

If an organization prefers to maintain the status quo, it will only change when forced to. This will result in a mishmash of new, old and totally obsolete practices. One way to be prepared for change is to have procedures to respond to new requirements and opportunities……built into the organization. There is no such thing as cost-free status quo.

Achieving Succes

Thursday, April 11th, 2013
Levels of student achievement have continued to decrease despite increases in the school resources applied to the learning process over the years.  Few educators would argue that standardized tests are the best measure of school effectiveness.  Yet, there are many technical issues involved in the tests themselves ad how the scores are reported and analyzed.

The reality is that the test results are concise and appealing to the public….. hence important to the school. They also are consequential for individual students, who need good scores to qualify for high school graduation, colleges, and scholarships. So, new approaches to assessment and better tests may be needed in the long run, but in the short run it would be of benefit simply to achieve higher scores. Two effective means to this end currently are available. The first focuses on the test scores directly, while the second reaches beyond the tests to each school’s curriculum and preparation of students to lead productive and fulfilling lives.  This is the technique that eTutor uses to improve the online teaching-learning process

Another effective approach is to develop the study skills which facilitate the learning process…..skills which are not covered in most school curricula. The deeper issue behind raising test scores is the instructional effectiveness of the school. Improvements here mean better-prepared individuals, lifelong learning, and progress for society. An important part of this improvement process involves assessing the needs in various aspects of the instructional program and its operation, then evaluating the progress which results from improvement efforts.


Special Help in Test Taking

Tuesday, February 26th, 2013

Many students will soon be preparing for those annual tests that have become so much a part of the public school experience.  Different types of tests are tackled in different ways.  It is important for your child to recognize what kind of test it is and plan the right strategy.   Here are some special helps for your child to remember:

  • In a true/false test
    Everything in the statement must be true for the correct answer to be “true.”
    Watch for key words.  Always, never and only frequently point to a false answer.

    Sometimes, usually and typically tend to point to a true answer.

  • On a matching test
    Check first to see if you can use an answer more than once.  If not, be sure to mark off the answers as you use them.
  • On a multiple choice test
    Watch for qualifying phrases which can change the meaning such as:  the only, the last, which one is not an example of.
  • On an essay test
    Prepare for essay tests ahead of time by thinking of essay questions which might appear on the test.
  • Organize relevant information from the text that answers these questions.
  • Write out actual answers to your questions using as much detail as possible.
  • If your answers aren’t satisfactory, begin again.check.gif (1162 bytes)

Be sure you answer the specific question that is being asked.

Change

Saturday, February 9th, 2013

The only constant in life is CHANGE. Change permeates everything we are and do. People change, plans change. Organizations change. Change is natural, it is normal. Yet, the resistance to change is also just as normal and natural a part of human nature as the acceptance of change. The secret of growth and advancement is learning how to deal with the pressures of change…..turning positive actions to our advantage, while blunting negative ones.

The capacity to be alone is a valuable resource when changes are necessary. In a culture in which interpersonal relationships are considered to provide the answer to every form of distress, it is sometimes difficult to persuade well-meaning helpers that solitude can be as therapeutic as emotional support. (A. Storr, 1988)

Personal change is the most powerful route to system change. Individuals today can leverage change far more effectively than most institutions. (Naisbitt and Aberdene, 1990)  We at Knowledge Headquarters have been fortunate to see change come in a variety of ways to the those we work with. Our greatest challenge has been convincing individuals that they do have power and can initiate change, not only for themselves, but for those around them.

Remember When

Sunday, January 20th, 2013

A computer was something on TV

from a science fiction show of note

a window was something you hated to clean…

And ram was the cousin of a goat….

Meg was the name of my girlfriend

and gig was a job for the nights

now they all mean different things

and that really mega bytes

An application was for employment

a program was a TV show

a cursor used profanity

a keyboard was a piano

Memory was something that you lost with age

a cd was a bank account

and if you had a 3 1/2″ floppy

you hoped nobody found out

Compress was something you did to the garbage

not something you did to a file

and if you unzipped anything in public

you’d be in jail for a while

Log on was adding wood to the fire

hard drive was a long trip on the road

a mouse pad was where a mouse lived

and a backup happened to your commode

Cut you did with a pocket knife

paste you did with glue

a web was a spider’s home

and a virus was the flu

I guess I’ll stick to my pad and paper

and the memory in my head

I hear nobody’s been killed in a computer crash

but when it happens they wish they were dead

Sent by Jamie Stauder

Overcoming Conventional Wisdom

Sunday, July 8th, 2012

TowerFor centuries, people believed that Aristotle was right when he said that the heavier an object, the faster it would fall to earth. Aristotle was regarded as the greatest thinker of all times and surely he could not be wrong. All it would have taken was for one brave person to take two objects, one heavy and one light, and drop them from a great height to see whether or not the heavier object landed first. But no one stepped forward until nearly 2000 years after Aristotle’s death. In 1589, Galileo summoned learned professors to the base of the leaning Tower of Pisa. Then he went to the top and pushed off a ten-pound and a one-pound weight. Both landed at the same time. But the power of belief in the conventional wisdom was so strong that the professors denied what they had seen. They continued to say Aristotle was right.

Online Learning Offers Solutions for Children of Military

Monday, April 25th, 2011

Nearly one million military children are in educational programs each year.  Many attend public school in districts operated by local educational agencies. Others attend schools established and operated by the U.S. Department of Defense.  There are many transitions military children must make when they have to move from one school to another because a military parent changes duty stations.  The children often find it hard to assimilate into new school situations.  It’s a struggle providing continuity in learning when going from one base to another and moving from one state or country to another.  It is a challenge for military parents, moving children and then trying to decide which educational program is best.

Online learning is a logical choice for military families who are looking for continuity in the teaching-learning process for their children.  DoDEA policy provides for allowable home-based educational programming expenses that include fees for curriculum-related on-line Internet services, such as study programs and distance learning.  They will pay tuition charges of on-line Internet instruction associated with a formal recognized home-study course or other authorized program.

Online military homeschooling offers real-time learning in a vast number of subjects and topics for individual instruction. The best online learning program provides students and parents the flexibility necessary for true knowledge to take place. Most online instructional programs provide a core curriculum that will prepare students to enter schools, colleges, and universities in the United States.

Informed parents in all the armed services, Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force and the Coast Guard choose online military homeschooling for their children for many reasons. An accessible online instructional program may be the one stable thing the children may have.  Their learning program will always be there.  Students do not need to be time bound by their learning program.  The quality and range of instructional content determines the excellence of online instruction. Web-based, online learning gives students a unique opportunity to explore learning and gain knowledge at their own level.  Online learning offers a way to stay ahead of the information flow of an expanding knowledge base.

When students are in public or private schools, they must use whatever curriculum the school and teacher is using.  Online learning levels the playing field for children of all levels.  Military homeschooling parents have many ways to approach the teaching-learning process for their child when using an online educational program.  Learning doesn’t have to be with a textbook.  Parents enjoy the ‘aha’ moments when they actually see their child learning.

Military living has a way of testing the idea of schooling because everything is so unpredictable.  In this regard online learning is reinventing the idea of school.  The integration of knowledge is a personal process, rather than a social process.  By viewing schooling not so much as a place, but the act of learning, those who embrace online learning have forced us to look at a new paradigm for schooling.  Military parents, who homeschool, recognize that acquiring knowledge does not need to be a group activity, but is often more effective as an individual activity.  They know that how they, themselves,  learned as children, is not the best method of learning for their children.

Military families using an online instructional program have an incredible advantage. No matter what service the parent is in….Army, Navy, Marines,  Air Force or Coast Guard… moving is hard enough, adding traditional schooling to it is infinitely more difficult. A child who is free to learn in his own environment, doing what he loves, excelling where he can and seeing the world is a fortunate child.  Instead of feeling the insecurity of moving, they have that strong unmoving foundation of their online instructional homeschool program. They can thrive and be free to learn and achieve no matter where they are in the world.