January 1999 - Volume 2.5
e-News
Visit us at http://www.strategicstudies.com
 
President's Notes

Success

Can-Do Kids

Choosing Books for Your Children

What Parents Ask About How to Work With Their School

Remember When ...

Knowledge Net

Great January Sites to See on the Web

President's Notes

Happy New Year! The new year entered into our part of the world with a blast. As I write this, it is snowing hard, the wind is blowing and drifts are growing. There is something peaceful and beautiful about snow as it paints the landscape white. With the usual distractions of color and noise gone, I can refocus on who I am, what I am doing, and where I am going. Setting priorities are all part of a new beginning.....a new year.

This year holds much promise as we prepare for a new millennium. The year is really a transition year as we move into a new era. More important than ever before is to have a vision of where we want to go. For if we lose sight of that vision we may lose opportunities to make significant changes not only in our personal lives, but for mankind as a whole. Significant changes are not always great, huge, earth shattering occasions. Instead the most significant changes are the small simple things we do on a daily basis that cause subtle changes in who we are, what we do and how we affect those around us. These changes don’t come, if we haven’t taken the opportunity to plan....to develop a vision for our future.

And so, in that regard, Strategic Studies is beginning to view what we do in the education arena in a new way. Traditionally we have viewed education as a social process, yet it is in reality a personal process. The integration of knowledge is personal. Our work will be a continuing effort to assist those we serve to understand and adapt their learning and instructional programs by offering choices for personal learning.

As the New Year begins may you have a white landscape to paint visions for your future and may all your visions become real.

M Angulo




 

e-News Page 2
 
President's Notes

Success

Can-Do Kids

Choosing Books for Your Children

What Parents Ask About How to Work With Their School

Remember When ...

Knowledge Net

Great January Sites to See on the Web

Success

Success is always started by
the battery of
ambition, and the spark
plug of purpose
 
It is powered by the
fuel of persistence,
lubricated by the
elbow grease of effort.
 
Guided by the steering
wheel of common sense
and smoothed by
the shock absorbers
of faith
and forgiveness.
 
W.A. Ward

You can motivate your child for successful learning by building self-esteem. Ask your child to describe himself. Do bright, positive, upbeat words come out....smart, good, nice, popular, happy?

Or do you hear.....dumb, fat, mad, broke, and a list of "can’t do" things like can’t read very well, can’t run fast, can’t make friends, can’t do math?

Before a child can achieve learning success, he needs to believe in himself.....have an image of self-worth.....a sense of being capable....a sense of self-esteem. He needs to see himself as a "can-do" kid.

Research shows that these feelings of confidence contribute to success in learning, success in social relationships, and high self-esteem.

Choosing Books for Your Children

One of the best ways to encourage children’s reading is to give them books of their very own. With so many children’s books in print, however, making the best selections may seem like a formidable task.

 

e-News Page 3
 
President's Notes

Success

Can-Do Kids

Choosing Books for Your Children

What Parents Ask About How to Work With Their School

Remember When ...

Knowledge Net

Great January Sites to See on the Web

Since all children should have books they can handle freely, durability is important, says the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Educational Research and Improvement. Pick well-constructed board books for infants and toddlers, so they can help turn pages without damage. Consider paperbacks and plastic covers for older kids who are not quite ready for expensive hardbacks.

Next, let your children’s interests guide your selections, suggests the Department of Education. When children ask you endless questions about where they came from or why the sky is blue, chances are good there is a book with answers they can understand. If a child expresses an interest in cars, sports, computers or dinosaurs, find books on those topics. If you will be reading aloud together, remember to choose books you can enjoy too.

Quality is as important to children as it is to adults, according to the Library of congress Children’s Literature Center. Well-written fiction with a satisfying plot and strong characterization will motivate your children to keep reading. Good illustration and design are essential to picture-story books. Critical to non-fiction are accuracy, organization and clarity of presentation.

Also keep in mind your children’s reading ability. Books should be challenging enough to stimulate their thinking skills but not so difficult as to overwhelm them. The Department of Education suggests school-sponsored book fairs as an excellent source of offerings geared to your children’s ages and reading levels.

Is cost a factor in your selection? Many second-hand bookstores offer very reasonable prices. Some even allow you to bring in books your children have outgrown and trade them for others. Many public libraries also have periodic used-book sales. Ask a librarian for dates and details.

If you are still not sure what is appropriate, take advantage of available help. Teachers and children’s librarians can suggest books that are good for reading aloud and books of interest to a particular age group. Most libraries have book lists and journals that regularly review and recommend children’s books.


 

e-News Page 4
 
President's Notes

Success

Can-Do Kids

Choosing Books for Your Children

What Parents Ask About How to Work With Their School

Remember When ...

Knowledge Net

Great January Sites to See on the Web

What Parents Ask About How to Work With Their School

Parents want to work with schools. But they don’t always know how. That is the result of a survey conducted by the Metropolitan Life Company.

When it comes to their relationship with school, parents want to know:

  • How to work with the educational system at the classroom, school, and district level.
  • How they can be more involved at all levels of education, including high school.
  • How they can spend more time in school.
  • How they can contribute to the school.
  • How to talk to school officials.

Remember When ...

A computer was something on TV
from a science fiction show of note
a window was something you hated to clean...
And ram was the cousin of a goat....
 
Meg was the name of my girlfriend
and gig was a job for the nights
now they all mean different things
and that really mega bytes
 
An application was for employment
a program was a TV show
a cursor used profanity
a keyboard was a piano



 

 

page 5 - e-News
 
President's Notes

Success

Can-Do Kids

Choosing Books for Your Children

What Parents Ask About How to Work With Their School

Remember When ...

Knowledge Net

Great January Sites to See on the Web

Memory was something that you lost with age
a cd was a bank account
and if you had a 3 1/2" floppy
you hoped nobody found out
Compress was something you did to the garbage
not something you did to a file
and if you unzipped anything in public
you'd be in jail for a while
Log on was adding wood to the fire
hard drive was a long trip on the road
a mouse pad was where a mouse lived
and a backup happened to your commode
 
Cut you did with a pocket knife
paste you did with glue
a web was a spider's home
and a virus was the flu
I guess I'll stick to my pad and paper
and the memory in my head
I hear nobody's been killed in a computer crash
but when it happens they wish they were dead
 
Sent by Jamie Stauder

Knowledge Net

Visit us at our Knowledge Net website. The topic of the month is weather.

Our On-Line Weatherman is on board this month to take weather related questions from you.

Just e-mail your question to weatherman@e-tutor.com and he will respond within 24 hours.

 

page 6 - e-News
 
President's Notes

Success

Can-Do Kids

Choosing Books for Your Children

What Parents Ask About How to Work With Their School

Remember When ...

Knowledge Net

Great January Sites to See on the Web

Great January Sites to See on the Web:

The National Archives and Records Administration offers dozens of primary sources and activities on-line, including lessons on the Lincoln Memorial, the Amistad case, and more. http://www.nara.gov/education/teaching/teaching/html

Federal Resources for Educational Excellence offers links to math, science and history materials for teachers and students. http://www.ed.gov/free

Tipsheets teachers can print for parents on subject like helping children learn to read and effective discipline. Http://www.nea.org/helpfrom/connecting/tools

 

 

Copyright 1999 Strategic Studies (http://www.strategicstudies.com)