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In The News
                             March 2005   Vol. 8-3

President’s Message

March!  Officially Spring is just a few days away.  My garden continues to protest the cold and snow that just doesn't seem to want to go away.  Tulips and daffodils are pushing their little green heads up through the brown soil in spite of the weather.  They will be ready to provide us with the beautiful colors of Spring when the sun and warmth finally arrive.    

We are pleased to announce the e-Tutor Virtual Learning is officially accredited through CITA - The Commission on International and Trans-Regional Accreditation.  e-Tutor is listed as accredited in the International Registry of Accredited Schools at www.accreditedschools.org.   We knew after the Accreditation Team's visit that the program would pass their rigorous screening.  With the announcement, we can place the official logo on our webpages and display it on print documents.  We are so very pleased for our students and their parents who have another reason to trust and value this exceptional program.  In the months ahead we will be positioning the program to provide diplomas for graduating seniors as well.   

Over the last few months we have worked very closely with an organization providing extended programming with the e-Tutor Program.  Since we are striving for the same goal, to provide superior learning content for those who use the Internet as their primary means of learning, it made sense to join forces with Brilliant Learning.  We have a tentative agreement to create an alliance where their company will come under the Knowledge HQ umbrella.  The arrangement will provide more options for e-Tutor subscribers and give us the opportunity to reach a larger population of subscribers.   We are excited at the prospect of working with a talented group of individuals who care about education and students as we do.     

It's St. Patrick's Day as I write this.  And although you will receive this several days after, this old Irish blessing arrived one day in my mailbox and I just needed to pass it on to each of you..  We so often forget to tell those around us how important they are.  Your continued involvement and enthusiasm for what we do makes my daily journey a joy.  Thank you.  May each day this month be special.

May the road rise to meet you. 
May the wind be always at your back. 
May the sun shine warm upon your face, 
the rain fall soft upon your fields. 
And until we meet again, 
may God hold you in the palm of his hand.  

Happy St. Patrick's Day!

 


Knowledge Headquarters Launches a Second WebSite

This month we have launched a second website for Knowledge Headquarters.  We think you will like this informative new website.  You will be able to view information about our expanded offerings, learn more about us or just explore.  Please give us your opinions.  We value them.         

                              www.knowledgeheadquarters.com

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Blow your own horn loud.  If you succeed, people will forgive your noise, if you fail, they'll forget it," 


Learning with e-Tutor

Parents and students often ask which lesson or subject should be completed when they logon to e-Tutor.  To help you in deciding which subjects and lessons to tackle, we provide the following suggestions.  Students may choose any of the many lessons listed from the menu of lessons in the program.  Some will be easier and are meant as a review and some will be more challenging.  This method of selecting topics of interest for learning has been very successful for e-Tutor learners over the years.  All levels in the e-Tutor program have lessons in the major subject areas.  The skills and topics presented in the lessons are age and grade appropriate. 

e-Tutor Virtual Learning Middle-Junior High School Coursework

# Lessons

Curricular/Subject Area

90

Language Arts

30

 

Sixth – Reading/Listening

30

 

Seventh - Writing

30

 

Eighth – Literature

90

Mathematics

30

 

Sixth – Computation/Estimation

30

 

Seventh – Data Analysis/Measurement/Ratio-Percentages

30

 

Eighth – Algebra/Geometry

60

Science

20

 

Sixth – Geology/Astronomy

20

 

Seventh – Biology/Botany

20

 

Eighth – Chemistry/Physics

60

Social Studies

20

 

Sixth – World History/Geography

20

 

Seventh – U.S. History

20

 

Eighth – Politics/Economics/Sociology

30

Electives 

Total =  330

 

e-Tutor Virtual Learning High School Coursework

# Lessons

Curricular/Subject Area

120

Language Arts

30

 

Ninth – Listening/Reading

30

 

Tenth - Writing

30

 

Eleventh – Literature

30

 

Twelfth - Literature

120

Mathematics

30

 

Ninth – Computation/Estimation/Measurement

30

 

Tenth – Data Analysis/Ratio-Percentages

30

 

Eleventh – Algebra

30

 

Twelfth - Geometry

80

Science

20

 

Ninth – Biology

20

 

Tenth – Biology

20

 

Eleventh – Chemistry

20

 

Twelfth – Physics

80

Social Studies

20

 

Ninth – Geography

20

 

Tenth – History

20

 

Eleventh – Politics

20

 

Twelfth - Economics

40

Electives

Total =  440

 

Ten new lessons were added to e-Tutor this month.

Join the e-Tutor world of learning today to view the Lesson Library.  

We want to hear from you.  If you have questions or comments, please do not hesitate to contact us.  We enjoy hearing from parents, students and others.  

www.e-tutor.com


This is a Gentleman or Woman

A gentleman or gentlewoman is a person bent on shaping his or her mind to give happiness to others.  A gentleman's life leads upwards; he cherishes worth; he is fair, broad, calm, spacious; his own life is modest; he puts deeds before words; he helps the needy; he considers what is right, not what will pay; he trusts in justice, not in favor; he is consistent, not changeless; he is firm, not quarrelsome; he is a friend, not a partisan. 

Here, moreover, are the nine aims of a gentleman or woman: "To see clearly; to understand what he hears; to be warm in manner; dignified in bearing; faithful in speech; painstaking at work; to ask when in doubt; in anger, to think of difficulties; in sight of gain, to remember right."

Confucius 

 

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Some men see things as they are and ask, "Why?" I dream things that never were and ask, "Why not?"


Listening and Talking 
to Your Teen

Being a parent is not easy.  Being a good parent is even harder.  It is never too early...nor is it ever too late...to begin to try to understand your child's own special point of view on growing up.  And the rewards of understanding are always well worth the effort.  

Sometime around the early teen years, your child begins to move from a child's adjustment to the world to an adult's.  This is a difficult time for both parent and child, but the parent at least has the advantage of an adult perspective on the situation.  The rapid physical changes...both internal and external...taking place in teenagers cause them to react emotionally to everything that happens.  They may be jubilant one minute and deeply depressed the next.  

The problems may seem insignificant to you, but hey are very real to teenagers.  They may not admit it, but they still need the strength of your guidance.  Be there when you're needed, but don't press if they don't unburden themselves immediately.  Their need for privacy is stronger than ever. 

The principal need of teenagers is to be accepted socially, by friends of both sexes, in the normal course of tackling the problem of breaking away from the family...which they must do...they rebel against parental control and conform to the dictates of "the crowd."  Life will be easier if you tolerate unimportant fads in dress, haircuts or speech, in moderation, but when your child's well-being is affected, you must set a limit...with drugs, sex, cigarettes and the like. 

Encourage the good in your teenager more often than you punish the bad.  But when the limits are overstepped, punishment that is suitable to a young adult is necessary.  Your teenager needs you as a parent, not a pal.  Avoid sarcasm.  Resist any impulse to criticize your teenager in front of others....especially friends.  Talk things over when you are calm; if you are upset, your words will reach your teenager as just so much nagging.  Ultimately, your own example of behavior will make a strong impression on your child at this stage.  If you respect your teenager, talk openly and are fair in your demands, you can help make easier the difficult transition from childhood to adulthood.   

Adapted from National Education Association


 

Assertiveness: A Key to Getting Along Without Losing Self-Respect

Chances are you have met your share of difficult people.  They put you down in front of others.  They borrow things and don't return them.  They pressure you to do things that violate your values...like smoking, drinking or using drugs.  They want their way and forget that you have rights.

Most likely, you have also had some of these experiences.  You need help with a problem, but you don't want to look stupid.  You want to request a favor, but you are afraid you will be told "no."  You want to say "no" yourself, but your are afraid you will lose friends or appear to be selfish. 

Assertiveness is an attitude and a way of acting that lets you express your feelings, ask for what you need, or say no to something you don't want.  Assertive behavior helps you communicate so that others really hear what you are saying.  Assertiveness gains respect from others.  

Assertive behavior does not involve selfishness or getting your own way at the expense of others.  Perhaps the best way to describe assertive behavior is to contrast it with two other types of behavior...passive and aggressive.  

 Aggressive people don't respect the rights and feelings of others.  They push people around and seek to get their own way, no matter who gets hurt.  They often insult and abuse others.  They demand things rather than asking nicely.  They act as if they are better than other people.  

Passive people try to please everyone else, but they don't respect themselves.  They let others have their way, while ignoring their own rights and needs.  They don't stand up for themselves when others insult them or abuse them.  They're afraid to ask for things they need or want.  They don't believe they are quite as important as other people. 

Assertive people strike a positive balance between these two extremes.  They stand up for their own rights, but respect the rights of others at the same time.  They ask for things they want or need in a polite, honest way.  They don't insult or abuse others.  Nor do they allow others to insult or abuse them.  They believe they deserve respect and good treatment.  An assertive person is likely to say, "I'm not any better than other people, but I'm every bit as good."

Adapted from Illinois Association of School Boards

 

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Imagination is the secret reservoir of the riches of the human race. 

 

A Layered Curriculum

A comprehensive curriculum should provide for different learning styles, multiple intelligences, various languages, disabilities and abilities.  This can be quite a juggling act. However, a technique we simulate in the e-Tutor program called "layering" can meet the diverse needs of today's learners.  Each unit of instruction builds upon the other and is divided into layers or sections.  The first section has a variety of assignment choices that accommodate a range of abilities. This section allows students to collect general information on a topic or skill.  The next section requires students to apply, create or problem solve with the information gained at the first level.  The final section asks students to do a critical analysis of issues pertaining to the topic of study.  

The biggest concern for students and parents are state-mandated, end-of-the-year exams and college entrance exams.  Will students who are taught in this manner do well on criterion-referenced tests?  That is probably the best feature of this learning strategy.  Nearly all the research coming out in educational psychology supports student-centered instruction to increase long-term learning and retention.  

Because students are choosing their own lessons and because they are immediately held accountable for their learning, they tend to do better on end-of-year exams.  Apparently, when students are allowed more involvement in the educational process, the testing issues take care of themselves. 

Excerpts from  from Classroom Leadership

 



 

Moving 
Physical Education

 

WARNING:  The Surgeon General has determined that inactivity can be hazardous to our health. 

The message is clear:  People who exercise regularly are healthier than those who don't.  Yet less than half of our kids are involved in regular physical activities and participation in all types of physical activities declines strikingly as age and grade increases.  

Standards developed by the National Association for Sport and Physical Education (NASPE) call for students to master a variety of basic movement skills needed to play any sport or perform a fitness activity. The fundamental motor skills include running, throwing, kicking, catching, etc.  The goal is to enable all students to hone essential skills that can be transferred from sport to sport and activity to activity.  The focus centers on individualized instruction rather than on playing the game. 

In recent years many states have decreased physical education requirements.  Parents and educators increasingly must  help students learn how movement and fitness are related and how to asses which fitness-related factors may be keeping them from successful performance.

Adapted from Teacher Today

 


Misunderstanding the 
Other Half

When communicating with the opposite sex, one thing is clear:  men and women sometimes seem to speak different languages.  Research reports women say men could improve communication by becoming more empathic listeners.  On the other hand, men say women could improve communication by being more direct.  Researchers offer the following suggestions for improving communication:  

Women, you can communicate better with men if you:

  • Ask for what you want.  Don't expect men to know what you want if you haven't asked for it.  

  • Be careful about nodding if you don't agree.  Although nodding is useful as an "encouraging" tactic in conversation, the speaker may assume that you agree with the idea expressed if you nod.  If you disagree with a speaker, don't nod while listening.

  • Speak up confidently.  Don't undermine your ideas by using modest phrases such as "This is only my opinion."  Be direct when asking questions and presenting ideas. 

Men, you can communicate better with women if you:

  • Avoid interrupting.  Research shows that men interrupt women more than women interrupt men.  Resist the urge to comment while a woman is speaking.  Write down a word or two to remind yourself of what you want to say, then resume eye contact and listen.

  • Use reflecting skills to demonstrate empathy.  A comment like, "It sounds as if you are pretty frustrated" shows the woman that you have heard and understood her.  

  • Don't try to fix every problem.  Women often talk to "vent," while men talk to solve problems.  This can lead to the "you just don't understand" syndrome when women who are looking only for a sympathetic ear end up getting unwanted advice from male friends and relatives. 

The Office Professional

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Press on.  Nothing in the world can take the place of persistence.  

 

 

Marvelous 
March Links

 

 

 

Estuary Live!:  Estuary Live will take place May 3-5, 2005. Free to participants (but please sign up in advance), the field trip will explore the Rachel Carson Site of the North Carolina National Estuarine Research Reserve, covering four islands and salt marshes off the North Carolina coast. Resources include a motion picture and still images of estuary inhabitants. 
http://www.estuarylive.org/ 

Zona Land:   Created by high school math and physics teacher Ed Zobel,  Zona Land provides resources for students to fully grasp major concepts in 
Algebra, Geometry and Physics. Using a variety of programming methods, he creates tools and lessons. Divided into two sections, "More Mathematics than Science" and "More Science than Mathematics" students can better visualize waves, graphing and much more. 
http://id.mind.net/~zona/ 

Degree Search:   Find the colleges and universities that offer specific types of degree or certificate programs. For example, a search for degree programs in 
"biomedical engineering" in the United States returned links to 40 different schools. For students who know the type of program in which they wish to enroll; this is a great tool.
http://www.degreesearch.com/

University of Illinois Extension: Schools Online:   At this site there are units targeting different grades and disciplines. Need to know about Incubation and Embryology, The Adventures of Herman (the worm), and Apples and More. Let students Walk in My Shoes, as they participate in a variety of activities that 
increase awareness of aging, the human body and the role of senior citizens in society. High school athletes will like the information found in Sports and Nutrition: The Winning Connection.
http://www.urbanext.uiuc.edu/SchoolsOnline/index.html

Tinfoil:   This site is  dedicated to the preservation of early recorded sound Would you like to hear the sounds of the early 20th century? Visit this 
website to hear the music of the times originally preserved on wax cylinder recordings. Students can learn about the early technology used to record sound and hear bands, singers and statesmen of the day. The Cylinder of the Month Archive links to a variety of sounds, both in WAV and Real format.
http://www.tinfoil.com/

Linear Algebra Toolkit:   This site is designed by staff at Old Dominion University to help a student understand basic linear algebra procedures. Learn to solve linear systems of equations or transform a matrix to row echelon form.
http://www.math.odu.edu/~bogacki/lat/

Communication Skills Writing Program:    This Northern Illinois University website contains good resources for students and educators. Editor's Grammar and Mechanics tutors students on editing terminology and punctuation and allows students to quiz themselves. The use of quotations and plagiarism are also covered.
http://www.engl.niu.edu/comskills/

Have a Great Month

From the Knowledge HQ Staff

 

Copyright © 2005 Knowledge Headquarters, Inc. All Rights Reserved. www.knowledgehq.com