March 1999 Issue - Volume 2.7
Strategic Studies e-News
Visit us at http://www.strategicstudies.com
 
President's Notes

The "Take-Charge Kid"

Face to Face Communicating

Risks

Consulting

March Links

President's Notes

What happened to February? It flew by in our part of the world. Did it go by quickly for you also? Perhaps it is the time of year, but I find myself wandering out in my garden looking for the new shoots of growth that are beginning to push their heads through the brown earth. I am anxiously waiting to see if the rewards of my work last Fall have been worth the effort. A visual reminder of the work is a wonderful way to evaluate what one has done.

In the school districts we consult in, we have seen the anxiety from both teachers and students as they have prepared for the annual Spring rite of assessing student achievement. The pressure has been increased in recent years, as the public has required more accountability for what is happening in America’s schools. We view assessment as an important tool in analyzing the course of instruction in schools.

This month we have been evaluating and realigning the direction in which we are going. This is part of our regular work of evaluating our systems and programs to determine that we continue to provide the type of service that our clients anticipate. When we are out in school districts consulting, we have immediate feedback about our programs, yet with our Internet businesses we depend on the number of hits and the number of subscribers to our programs. This digital frontier finds us doing a lot of self evaluating and planning based on how we view the future. The old paradigms of evaluation and analysis are changing, yet they are vitally important to those who will retain a place in this new environment. In the future we hope you will help us in the evaluation process by completing an online form we will provide for our visitors.

Happy Saint Patrick’s Day!

M Angulo

 

e-News Page 2
 
President's Notes

The "Take-Charge Kid"

Face to Face Communicating

Risks

Consulting

March Links

THE "TAKE-CHARGE KID"

How can you help your child build a "take-charge" attitude and assume more responsibility for learning? Read and discuss these self-management strategies together:

1. Set Goals

Help your child learn to set goals and work to achieve them. Let your child know that successful people set goals. To succeed goals should be:

  • Short-term - do-able in a brief period of time
  • Specific - "75% on the weekly math test" or "completing a research report on schedule" are clearly defined goals. You will both know when a specific goal has been met.
  • Realistic - set only slightly above current level of achievement so that improvement can be recognized frequently.
  • Planned - to include the when, where, why, how, and how long of meeting the goal successfully.

2. Be an example

Give examples of goals you have set and met. Tell results and benefits of meeting goals. Let your child know that you feel good about what you achieved.

Discuss stories about people in the news who have set and met goals so that your child sees the value of taking responsibility for achievement

3. Introduce checklists

Checklists build responsibility and provide the sense of achievement that comes from checking completed items off a list.

 

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President's Notes

The "Take-Charge Kid"

Face to Face Communicating

Risks

Consulting

March Links

4. Encourage a positive approach

A "can’t do" approach weakens a child’s will to "take-charge" of learning.

5. Understand instructions

Your child can’t gain a sense of responsibility, work independently, and "take-charge" in learning situations without understanding directions and instructions. Help your child know what to do with everyday instruction words by explaining, using, and reviewing the key words and phrases of instruction, such as:

circle P cross out P underline P delete P omit P graph
compare/contrast P explain P outline

6. Ask questions

When students sense that they need to know more about a topic, their motivation increases and they want to take responsibility for more learning.

7. Give praise

Praise used effectively can increase your child’s motivation and build a sense of responsibility for learning.

Praise for successful or improved performance, not just working on a task. Wait until you see that enough effort has been put forth, or enough work accomplished, so that praise is truly deserved.

8. Build on success

Once your child’s skills are beginning to expand and you see a "take-charge" attitude toward learning, you can help build on this success.

  • Give opportunities to practice skills informally
  • Encourage interests, activities, and hobbies that provide practice in learning
  • Give increased responsibility

 

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President's Notes

The "Take-Charge Kid"

Face to Face Communicating

Risks

Consulting

March Links

FACE TO FACE COMMUNICATING

Recently at a large convention I had an opportunity to view first hand the good and bad in communicating. These tips are great for anyone to use:

  • Always remember that you never get a second chance to make a good first impression.
  • Every individual is a communicator and has credibility with someone.
  • Be genuine and honest. If you don’t know, don’t guess.
  • Be enthusiastic. A spark is essential if you want to motivate enthusiasm in others.
  • Identify key communicators.
  • Use every available means to get people to "witness" quality efforts in action.
  • Encourage visibility.
  • Make communications a part of your objectives each year.
  • Don’t "PR people to death" suddenly.
  • Above all, listen. Listening is a sign of caring, is basic to building responsiveness, and is the key to confidence.

 

e-News Page 5
 
President's Notes

The "Take-Charge Kid"

Face to Face Communicating

Risks

Consulting

March Links


RISKS

  • To laugh is to risk appearing the fool.
  • To weep is to risk appearing sentimental.
  • To reach out for another is to risk involvement.
  • To expose feelings is to risk exposing your true self.
  • To place your ideas, your dreams before a crowd is to risk their loss.
  • To love is to risk not being loved in return.
  • To live is to risk dying.
  • To hope is to risk despair.
  • To try is to risk failure.
  • But risks must be taken, because the greatest hazard in life is to risk nothing.
  • The person who risks nothing, does nothing, has nothing, and is nothing.
  • They avoid suffering and sorrow, but they can not learn, feel, change, grow, love, live.
  • Chained by their attitudes, they are a slave, they have forfeited their freedom.
  • Only the person who risks is free.

Anonymous


CONSULTING

Many of my colleagues will be retiring or looking for a job change in the future. Many of them have discussed with me the possibilities available in consulting. It is not difficult to jump from practitioner to consultant. However, before you make that move, you must make some tough decisions:

  • Look hard at business development. Were you successful at selling ideas to colleagues and supervisors? Do you like selling? If not, you need to reconsider.

 

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President's Notes

The "Take-Charge Kid"

Face to Face Communicating

Risks

Consulting

March Links

  • Survey successful consultants. Find five whose backgrounds are similar to yours. Interview them.
  • Develop a game plan. Incorporate data from all sources. Create an action plan with several options.

March Links

  • http://cliffie.nosc.mil/~NATLAS/atlas/
    Atlas of the World : Easy Maps For Students. An index of all of the countries in the world. Allows the student to select a map of a continent or a country.
  • http://www.minerals.net/
    The Mineral and Gemstone Kingdom: A wonderful site full of pictures and tons of information for each mineral. The excellent organization allows students to view mineral lists according to various characteristics.

Copyright 1999 Strategic Studies (http://www.strategicstudies.com)