April 2004 Vol. 7 - 4

   

http://www.strategicstudies.com
 ..

President's
Message


Learning With e-Tutor

The Art of Working With People

Creativity

Nurturing Creativity

Write It, Don't Mail It!

Read With A Purpose

Eight Faces Most People Wear

Competing Intelligently

A Winning Trait

Astonishing April Links

Top of Page

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

President's
Message


Learning With e-Tutor

The Art of Working With People

Creativity

Nurturing Creativity

Write It, Don't Mail It!

Read With A Purpose

Eight Faces Most People Wear

Competing Intelligently

A Winning Trait

Astonishing April Links

Top of Page

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

President's
Message


Learning With e-Tutor

The Art of Working With People

Creativity

Nurturing Creativity

Write It, Don't Mail It!

Read With A Purpose

Eight Faces Most People Wear

Competing Intelligently

A Winning Trait

Astonishing April Links

Top of Page

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
President’s Message

 What a busy month we have had!  And we are not finished yet!  Since our last newsletter we have moved our office.  Not far....but far enough to cause some consternation and confusion in where things have been put, in getting computers synchronized and in making our new home comfortable.  It will take some time yet before we one hundred percent, but every day goes smoother than the last. 

In addition to the move we are changing our name to Knowledge Headquarters (Knowledge HQ).  Some of you will recognize the name, as we have used it for many years to present our learning themes.  The new name better reflects who we are.  It will take some time before our web pages reflect the change as well as our business documents.   

Knowledge Headquarters Inc.
6713 N. Oliphant
Chicago, IL 60631

Ph. 773- 467-9640
Fax 773-462-9740
Toll Free 877-687-7200

Well, all of these changes have kept us busy. But, we think in the end, the changes will benefit our students, parents and 
ed
ucators.  We will keep you informed of our progress.  We look forward to hearing your comments and answering your questions.
I hope you are enjoying the warmer weather we are experiencing in many parts of the world.  In our area the Spring flowers have blossomed and have added a much needed burst of color to our daily lives.  Last Fall I spent just a few hours putting bulbs in the ground.  This Spring I have been richly rewarded by their beautiful blossoms.  Wishing each of you a beautiful month.   

 

 


Spring seems to get the creative juices going.  Why not write a lesson for your students' online learning.   You can use the template at lessonpro.net to create inspiring lessons for your students.  Your students can access your lessons both at school and at home.  It's a great way to increase communication between home and school.  

 

 

Learning with e-Tutor

e-Tutor sets the standard in helping children learn using the Internet.  e-Tutor seamlessly integrates the Internet into the teaching-learning process by providing a host of engaging educational content.  No additional materials or tools are needed to provide quality education for your child. 
e -Tutor has curricular content in language arts, mathematics, social studies and science, plus progress reports for parents, resources and guidelines.   The program is used for both homeschooling and supplemental instruction.

Example of Typical Lessons in Math:

== Middle/Jr. High -- Mathematics ==
SUBJECT: Data Analysis

ANALYZE THIS!
ARE YOU "MEAN?"
BUDGET MATH
DID YOU "MEAN" THAT?
FINDING THE "MEAN" IN NUMBERS
FREQUENCY DISTRIBUTIONS
MEAN
MEDIAN AND MODE
PROFITS FROM SNACKS
WHAT DID YOU "MEAN?"
WHAT IS YOUR MODE?

e-Tutor lessons are cross-aged, so at the high school level, lessons are geared for students in the 9th - 12th grades; middle/junior high lessons are for students in 6th - 8th grades; intermediate lessons for 4th - 5th grades; and primary lessons for K - 2nd grades.  

We suggest no more than four lessons a day, as each lesson takes approximately one hour to one and a half hours to complete.  One lesson in each of the main curricular areas is sufficient.  To compare to a public school curriculum, count at least ten lessons as one unit.  Homeschooling is more concentrated so five or six hours of study is ample. 

To help organize the student work, set up four file folders, one for each of the four major areas.  As your child completes the activity and extended learning for each lesson he can place them in the appropriate folder.  You will want to check these each day to see how he is doing and the progress he has made. These should provide a springboard for discussion.

As your child begins to study each day, have him jot down the time on a piece of paper or calendar, as well as the time he stops.  Don't forget to include musical events, sports and field trips.  The time record can be kept with the file folders. 

We suggest that you supplement with good literature books, textbooks and workbooks if you have them.  Libraries are a good source.  Some of our parents have even been successful in borrowing these from the public schools in the neighborhood.

You may have some suggestions of your own.  We hope you will share these, so that they can be published in future newsletters.                                                               

If you are not an e-Tutor subscriber, visit our website now to learn more about this great way of learning!

www.e-tutor.com

Page 2


Nothing is impossible to a willing heart.

 

The Art of Working With People

You spend all of your life motivating people, getting people to do things for you.  As an infant your life depends on getting others to care for you.  As an adult your success largely stems from your ability to get others to do things.

It seems you are always faced with motivating someone to do something.  You want your children to get better grades, teachers to work harder, students to listen, your spouse to treat you better, or for others to take a deeper interest in their work. 

There is a rule that you can follow that will enable you to achieve these objectives, in other words, to be a good motivator.  Here it is: to the extent that you give others what they want, they will give you what you want!  The secret of the rule is that you must give others what they want first.  Then they will give you what you want.

Most people try to apply the rule backwards. One spouse thinks, “I wouldn’t be so frumpy around the house if my mate showed a little more love and affection towards me.”  The teacher waits until the student achieves the high standard of performance before recognition is given.

But, you see, that’s applying the rule backwards.  That’s like saying, “I’m going to wait until you give me what I want then maybe I’ll give you what you want.”  You must give others what they want first.  This is the key to motivating others.  And what do others want?  It isn’t money or personal benefits that people want most.  It’s what is called “psychic satisfaction.”

1.          Make them feel important.  It is believed that as many as 90% of the things we do are prompted by a desire to feel important.  Unfortunately, most of a person’s experiences communicate exactly the opposite.

2.          Give praise.  A psychologist once mentioned, “Raising children is not so difficult if parents would realize one thing.  Children need constant praise.  The human psyche seems to feed and thrive on praise and attention.  And people never really grow out of that constant need for praise and appreciation.

3.          Give people status.  Cars, homes and clothes are examples of status symbols.  People use these symbols to show others how important they are.  There are many such status symbols you can use to make others feel important.  A person’s own name is the sweetest sound in the world.  Use it often.  People like to see their pictures on the wall, a title after their names and surroundings that give them a little prestige. 

4.             Communicate.  Children and adults like to know what is going on.  They want to be told about problems, objectives and “inside information.”  They feel recognized and important when they are kept constantly informed.

5.          Give security. Others want us to be fair.  They must see that you have integrity and a set of values that they can depend on.  Your standards must be ones that stimulate the best in others. 

6.          Others need you.  People need people.  They need you.  They need you to give them what they want and need, psychic satisfaction.  And when you give them what they want they will give you what you want.  And that is what motivation is all about. 

Adapted from Public School Administrator

 


Good is not good where better is expected.  

Creativity

If you shy away from the word “creativity” because you think only of Picasso and Beethoven are entitled to use it, think again.  Most people are creative, but very few tap into their own supply.  One reason is cultural conditioning.  Creative solutions to problems are left to artists, not to hardheaded types. 
Anothe
r obstacle is in the association of creativity and art. 

Both are bunk and rest on an inflated definition of the term.  Creative people do something that is original and unique, no matter how small.  The guy at 3M who thought up Post-it notes was creative.

  And you are too.  All you need do is dig your creativity out from inside yourself.  Here are some ideas to help you:

1.          Make yourself comfortable with your unconscious mind.  As you probe your deepest inner thoughts you will find the road opening up to your childhood and the easy creative ability all children have.

2.          Pay attention to your dreams.  You don’t have to be Freud or spend ten years on the couch to do that.  Thinking about your dreams can reveal an interior logic that doesn’t show up right away and is lost if you simply forget about dreams.

3.             Counter-program yourself.  Do things you are not supposed to do.  Get rid of the shoulds and oughts that bedevil most of our lives. Make waves in order to explore new possibilities.  Change how you think.  Take risks within yourself to find out what you are capable of achieving.

4.          Free associate ideas.  Daydream.  Take time out.  Go for a walk with nothing on your mind.  Visualize.  Creative ideas often come when you are not thinking.

5.          Know yourself.  Yes, it’s a cliché, but remember that clichés emerge from a core of truth.  You do need to understand how you tick inside.

Executive Strategies

 

 

Nurturing Creativity

Don’t be too quick to dismiss a suggestion made by a family member.  You will stifle creativity.  To nurture creativity, try these three steps:

1.          Consider the strengths of the idea.

2.          List the potential benefits.

3.          Then voice your concerns.

When voicing your concerns, do so in the form of questions so the family member can work with you to overcome them.

Suggestion: Instead of saying, “We can’t do this,” ask, “How can we make it work?”

Roger L. Firestien, Center for Studies in Creativity  

Page 3


The greatest thing in this world is not so much where we are, but in what direction we are moving.

 

Write It, Don’t Mail It

Abraham Lincoln once heard a friend speak angrily of someone.  He advised his friend to sit and write out all of his abuse in a letter.  “It will do you good,” said Lincoln.  When the letter was written, it was read to Lincoln, who commended it heartily for its severity.  The writer was pleased and asked, “When should you advise me to send it?”

“Send it?”  Replied Lincoln.  “Oh, I wouldn’t send it.  I sometimes write a letter like that.  It does me a world of good, but I never send it!”

About 125 years later, a similar incident was reported by J. Willard Marriott Jr., head of Marriott Hotel chain, in What Works For Me: 16 CEOs Talk About Their Careers and Commitments (by Thomas R. Horton, Random House).  Marriott has an enormous staff and choosing good managers is very important to him. 

“When I look for someone to take on a major job,” Marriott says, “the most important thing for me is integrity.  I also look for drive...a high-energy level of commitment.  Intelligence is 
ext
remely  important, as is knowledge of the business.” 

Because of his high standards, Marriott is not always satisfied with the people he selects.  Handling problem employees is a real challenge for him In doing so, he uses an approach similar to Lincoln’s. 

“Perhaps it’s because I have such drive and such commitment that I tend to be impatient,”  he says.  “But I think I do a fair job of controlling that.  For example, when I write a sharp letter, I will put it in the bottom drawer, then wait for a week before I send it or rip it up.  If I am unhappy with somebody, I’ll wait.

“A cooling-off period is probably the most important thing of all.  If you get upset, you shouldn’t pick up the phone and start ranting and raving and carrying on.

“Learning not to do this comes with maturity and it comes with experience and learning how to deal with problems.”

The Pryor Report  

 

Read With A Purpose

Most of us live with a constant influx of magazines and periodicals.  They can easily turn from tools into a time-consuming burden when you view them purely as material that must be studies to keep up with our day to day lives.

To make this reading time most productive, try to approach it with the goal of finding at least one idea you can put to use from every publication you read.  This will help you focus your reading on the most important articles and you will also retain more.

Keep a notepad nearby to jot down the good ideas you find.  When you are finished, you will know you have gained something much more valuable from your reading than a clean square foot on your reading table.  

Working Smart  


He who never made a mistake never made a discovery

Eight Faces Most People Wear

  People’s facial expressions reveal what they really feel.  Do you agree?  Most people do.  They presume that how individuals appear is a better indicator of their true feelings than what they say.  Sometimes this assumption is valid.  Sometimes it is misleading!

  People’s personalities incline them to adopt one of eight different styles for using facial expressions to convey emotion, say researchers.  Below is a summary of the eight styles.  Can you identify your own?  Can you identify the style of your spouse?  Your child?

1.      Withholders display little or no emotion and may experience emotion at a relatively low level.

2.      Revealers feel and display a wide range of emotions vividly (the opposite of Withholders).

3.      Unwitting Expressors display feelings without realizing it (by blushing, for example), even when they try to keep them hidden and they wonder how others can read them so well.

4.     Blank Expressors wish to express feelings, but others cannot pick them up (the opposite of Unwitting Expressors).

5.    Substitute Expressors think they are expressing one emotion, but others read a different one, for example, they want to be warm and enthusiastic, but appear uneasy.

6.    Frozen-Emotion Expressors always are seen as manifesting the same “frozen” emotion, regardless of what they actually feel.

7.    Ever-Ready Expressors use the same particular expression whenever they first meet someone or start any social event, regardless of the circumstances or the appropriateness of the emotion.  They usually follow up with a more appropriate expression.

8.    Flooded-Emotion Expressors display one emotion in all circumstances, an emotion that is characteristic of them.  This emotion often is mixed with another emotion appropriate to the situation.  Someone might characteristically display annoyance and when feeling surprise, express both annoyance and surprise.

Unmasking the Face: A Guide to Recognizing Emotions from Facial Cues
 Paul Ekman and Wallace Friesen
 

Page 4


A person’s dreams are an index to their greatness.


Competing Intelligently

  Those who want to get ahead should learn to compete intelligently.  Here are some suggestions:  

1.             Compete against your best efforts.....not against the person across the aisle or across the hall.  This approach benefits everyone.

2.             Constantly try to be the best team player.  Your best reaction to almost everything should be: “I can help.”  Give up personal glory for team victories and help others get where they want to go.  Strive to be known as a collaborator and contributor rather than a “hot dog” or glory grabber.

3.          Shun the “super person urge” but don’t shrink away from those in trouble or in need of support.

4.          Be quick to co-author something or collaborate with others...especially newer people on the job.

5.          Adapt to changes and new directions.  Encourage those who work with you to do so, too.

Communication Briefings

 

A Winning Trait                       

A trait shared by most winners is persistence.   To learn persistence, remember these five suggestions:

  •    Ask yourself: What’s the next step?

  •    Then ask: What’s in the way of taking that step?

  •     Remove, disregard or ignore the obstacle.

  •     Take the step.

  •     Go to number 1.

Do It!, John-Roger and Peter McWilliams

Page 5


Hidden talent counts for nothing.

Nero

Astonishing April Links!

BBC Schools Online: Online games and sample testing are available (these are called revisions, like review quizzes). Once you get used to the subtle linguistic difference, this site is "brilliant."  Desert Challenge has students retrieving treasure from across the desert wastes. Navigate your way round obstacles, refueling and changing your money as you cross into new territories (using metric measurement).  Find other resources by grade level or discipline.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/education/

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Constructor: This site is kind of a two-dimensional erector set that lets you choose a shape, put it into motion and then tweak it by taking away gravity,  speeding it up and more. There are directions for this tool, but younger students could just go in and construct something, then write a story about it. High school and college students could use this when studying 
physics, evolution or robotics.
http://www.soda.co.uk/soda/constructor/

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Dive and Discover:  Daily updates and quizzes are available from this research project, sponsored by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. The current journey consists of  a series of research cruises to the Pacific and Indian Oceans.  See Plate Tectonics in action! Join the adventure May 24 - June 9, 2004 to the Juan de Fuca Ridge 
http://www.divediscover.whoi.edu/

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Math.com: Lessons and resources for math teachers of all ages. The references are very useful, such as English-Spanish Math Translations and the Glossary of Math Terms. You can generate Algebra Worksheets online, as are test prep for the SAT, ACT and more. Some links on this site are for registered (often paying) users, but there is much a math educator can use with his/her classes.
http://www.math.com/

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eNature:  This great site was developed by the National Audobon Society. Now, you have access to field guides for more than 4800 species of plants and animals. Start a list for you, as an individual or for your class, and add species as you see them. Find out more about various habitats in the US or ask an expert about a species you have observed. 
http://www.enature.com/

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KidsGardening.Com:  Planning a student garden and need a little virtual help? Or, your garden is growing great but you need ways to stimulate learning in this environment? This site, developed by the National Gardening Association,  supplies many creative ideas for teachers and parents to use while 
gardening with children. Learn about theme gardens, participate in an activity (like Plant a Question) or connect with another "garden"  teacher.
http://www.kidsgardening.org/

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The Knowledge Loom:  This site provides information about what is new in teaching and learning.  It is a place for educators to review research that identifies best practices related to various themes; view stories about the practices in real schools/districts; learn to replicate the success of these practices; and to participate in online events and discussions. 
“Spotlights” are specially organized collections of resources on
selected education topics or challenges. 
http://knowledgeloom.org/

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Great American Speeches:   Eighty years worth of great speeches are captured here, as well as some interesting exercises for students of speech and American History. The 
Critics Corner features Richard Nixon's Checkers' Speech, as well as background information and links within the speech to explain the context of specific words or terms used in the speech. Have your student try Could You Be A Politician, where she gets a chance to read from a mock teleprompter while looking honest, sincere and trustworthy. Some trick! 
http://www.pbs.org/greatspeeches/


Enjoy a Great Month!

From the Staff at Strategic Studies Corporation

 Copyright © 2004 Strategic Studies Corp.
http://www.strategicstudies.com