June 1998 Issue - Volume 1.10
Strategic Studies e-News
Visit us at http://www.strategicstudies.com
 
President's Notes

Overcoming Conventional Wisdom

What is Discipline?

Homework

Curriculum Writers Needed

Helpful Links

President's Notes

Garden FlowersThe other day a neighbor visited me while I was working in the garden. She wanted to talk about the changes occurring at the local school. Comparing the education she and her husband received with that her children were receiving, she had determined that they were getting an excellent education. Both parents were pleased their children were learning "so much more" than they had.

I had to agree with my friend, that, we most often use this standard of measurement for our children’s schooling. I certainly did when my children were young. But is this the best measure for quality in education? I asked the neighbor to consider how the world had changed, in the time since she was in school, and the amount of information we and our children have at our finger tips. It seems reasonable to assume that our children would, and should, be learning a great deal more of the information that took us years to assimilate. For the most part, our children begin school having access to more information than their parents had. By the time a child has completed one year of schooling that information has almost doubled. When I was in school it took many years for information to change. That provided me and those of my generation a certain consistency with learning information that is not available today. Therefore, I’m not certain that the same paradigms for learning, that served my neighbors and me, are adequate for today’s student.

Unfortunately, I do not have an easy answer for what should be or could be. I do know that when I hear about educators who continue to teach they way they have for many years, it concerns me. I have seen wonderful teachers who are very good with their students, but who are missing the mark in preparing their students for this fast paced world. That human aspect is so very important to teaching, but what of the child

 

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President's Notes

Overcoming Conventional Wisdom

What is Discipline?

Homework

Curriculum Writers Needed

Helpful Links

who does not receive adequate information to be successful in ensuing years. What a dilemma it raises for those of us who work with these well intentioned people on a daily basis. The tried and true paradigms of the past, that served us well, that prepared our youngster for a successful future, are not adequate today. We all have to try harder to challenge our own methods of educating and of evaluating schooling.
M Angulo

Overcoming Conventional Wisdom

TowerFor centuries, people believed that Aristotle was right when he said that the heavier an object, the faster it would fall to earth. Aristotle was regarded as the greatest thinker of all times and surely he could not be wrong. All it would have taken was for one brave person to take two objects, one heavy and one light, and drop them from a great height to see whether or not the heavier object landed first. But no one stepped forward until nearly 2000 years after Aristotle’s death. In 1589, Galileo summoned learned professors to the base of the leaning Tower of Pisa. Then he went to the top and pushed off a ten-pound and a one-pound weight. Both landed at the same time. But the power of belief in the conventional wisdom was so strong that the professors denied what they had seen. They continued to say Aristotle was right.

What is Discipline?

There are times when children simply need discipline, and nothing else will do. We discipline them because we love them. We discipline our children to prepare them for life. Discipline is training through containment, setting limits or boundaries with clearly defined consequences. Here are a few things that discipline provides to help children make good choices and to live life well:

 

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President's Notes

Overcoming Conventional Wisdom

What is Discipline?

Homework

Curriculum Writers Needed

Helpful Links

Discipline Provides Protection: Discipline provides limits that protect our children by keeping them away from danger. As we set limits, we also give our children ample opportunities to apply what they are learning to life.

Discipline Provides Security: In life, we must submit ourselves to people and laws to succeed. Teachers, police, principals, baby-sitters, parents and bosses have say over what is permissible and advisable behavior. To achieve and keep peace in our society, our children need to develop a healthy respect for those limits that make their lives make sense.

Discipline Provides Responsibility: In order for children to grow toward independence and take their place as adults, they must assume various responsibilities for themselves. They must learn to handle their money, to hold a job, and to manage emotions, to name a few. As they grow up, they learn that freedom and responsibility go together

Discipline Provides Training: Discipline trains a child in self-discipline and prepares the child for his future as an adult. A child who learns to do his chores or homework forms the habit of getting work done first, which leads to maturity and independence.

Support Hands

Homework

Following are guidelines for homework and parental involvement that have been issued by the Chicago Board of Education:

Kindergarten: 15 minutes a day

Parents: 15 minutes a day of reading and encouragement for homework.

 

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President's Notes

Overcoming Conventional Wisdom

What is Discipline?

Homework

Curriculum Writers Needed

Helpful Links

Grades 1 - 3: 30 minutes a day

Parents: 30 minutes a day of parent reading, writing and listening activities.

Grades 4 - 6: 45 minutes a day

Parents: 120 minutes a week of such activities as visiting museums and libraries and helping with longer school projects like book reports.

Grades 7 - 8: 90 minutes a day

Parents: 120 minutes a week of helping on research papers, creative writing, etc.

Grade 9: 120 minutes a day

Grade 10: 130 minutes a day

Grade 11: 140 minutes a day

Grade 12: 150 minutes a day

Student Study

Parents: 180 minutes a week of activities that promote cultural awareness, discussions of books and current events, help with longer writing assignments.

 

Finally

Money Bag "We are all of richer than we think we are."

~Montaigne

 

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President's Notes

Overcoming Conventional Wisdom

What is Discipline?

Homework

Curriculum Writers Needed

Helpful Links

Curriculum Writers Needed

Curriculum Writers NeededE-Tutor is hiring curriculum writers to write lessons for E-Tutor, an on-line, interactive web site.

A model lesson http://www.strategicstudies.com/lessonPlans demonstrates what a typical lesson includes. For more information please call (847)318-7110 (M-F, 9 AM to 5 PM, CST)

Helpful Links

Surf the Web

  • http://www.seds.org/hst/hst.html
    The best of the Hubbell space telescope information. This site has all of those amazing pictures taken that we have seen on television and in the newspaper. A great site!
  • http://www.parentsplace.com
    Reference information combined with chat rooms and bulletin-board discussion groups.
  • http://www.asd.com
    A directory of Web sites representing every K - 12 school in America.
  • http://globallib.nypl.org/
    A site by the New York Public Library that explores the evolution of mankind’s collective memory. The site has high-quality images of artifacts and illustrations that represent some of the most important ways in which our collective memory has evolved over the last 5,000 years.
  • http://www.startribune.com/stonline/html/special/homework
    Teachers from the Twin Cities area volunteer to keep this homework help site up and running. You can check individual subjects and see what other students have asked, and look at the website links the teachers have provided to help answer the questions.

Copyright 1998 Strategic Studies (http://www.strategicstudies.com)