October 2001 Vol. 4.8    
http://www.strategicstudies.com
 ..
President's
Message


Family Togetherness

Change:  Some Myths

Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs

Your Child Belongs

Fifteen Ways To Help Children Like Themselves

Fantastic Fall Links!

Top of Page

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

President's
Message


Family Togetherness

Change:  Some Myths

Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs

Your Child Belongs

Fifteen Ways To Help Children Like Themselves

Fantastic Fall Links!

Top of Page

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

President's
Message


Family Togetherness

Change:  Some Myths

Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs

Your Child Belongs

Fifteen Ways To Help Children Like Themselves

Fantastic Fall Links!

Top of Page

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

President's
Message


Family Togetherness

Change:  Some Myths

Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs

Your Child Belongs

Fifteen Ways To Help Children Like Themselves

Fantastic Fall Links!

Top of Page

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

President's
Message


Family Togetherness

Change:  Some Myths

Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs

Your Child Belongs

Fifteen Ways To Help Children Like Themselves

Fantastic Fall Links!

Top of Page

 

 
Presidentís Message

This morning I made a mad dash to bring in the remaining plants that I wanted to save over the winter. The weather is rapidly changing and before I could finish my deck was covered with hailstones. This unusual October thunderstorm is to be followed by much colder air and frost is predicted. Fall is a favorite time of year for me. The colors are as though someone had dipped a paintbrush into tubs of paint to color the trees and shrubs vibrant hues of red, orange, gold and bronze. Beautiful purples and pinks of flowers still linger, but all colors will soon give way to a winter landscape. Readying ourselves for a new season has been a tradition for those of us who live where the weather dictates our patterns.

This year has been a time of quiet contemplation as I have worked to ready my surroundings for colder temperature. I have found myself paying particular attention to those who are dear to me and to preparing my home for a more insulated period. This year, unlike other years it seems so necessary. As the month has progressed and our frailties as a nation and as individuals are exposed it helps to purposefully prepare for a change in seasons no matter where we live.

When there is an epidemic of violence, nobody can consider himself immune.  Violence has always been a fact of human existence, in every civilization.  The problem of international violence will continue to exist as long as the practice of violence goes unpunished and the causes go unsolved.   We know that those unwilling to accept the status quo can and do change it.   Change is all around us.  Nature changes; beaches erode or build; cold lands become colder...or warmer.  And people change.  We are people in a condition of change today.  Violence is a fact of life; its control is a problem of life.  How we deal with this change in our lives will determine our future. 

Take special joy in this season of passing, knowing that after a time of despair our future remains bright.


Have you checked out Homeschool Corner lately?  You will find lots of resources that will help you in homeschooling your children.  Take advantage of the Bulletin Board to respond to or to answer questions from visitors.     
 
More New Lessons at e-Tutor:

Primary

  • Animals in Spring
  • Animals in Summer
  • Ocean Animals
  • Why Leaves Change Their Colors
  • Animals in Fall
  • Animals in Winter
  • Dental Health         

High School                                                                                             

  • Thematic Analysis of "Tintern Abbey"
  • Direct Object Pronouns - Spanish
  • Thematic Analysis of "The Passing of Arthur"
  • Oedipus the King - Part 1

Intermediate

  • Measuring Rice

Middle/Junior High

  • Rice Fish Farming
  • Conditions of U.S. Rice Farming
  • What To Do With Rice Straw                                                                                                                               

New lessons are added on a regular basis.

Page 2

The strength of a nation, especially of a republican nation, is in the intelligent and well-ordered homes of the people.

Lydia Sigourney

Family Togetherness

Being loved and supported by other family members is essential for the well-being of both individuals and the family as a a whole. Children need to know they are cared for and loved by the important adults in their lives and that these feelings will continue even when they make mistakes or fail to live up to expectations.

Children grow by taking on new challenges.  In order to take on new challenges, children must feel they have a secure and loving base from which they can venture and to which they can return, regardless of their successes or failures.

Such unconditional affirmation and affection is also important for adults in the family.  Parents and spouses also need to know that they are valued and loved by those people who are most important to them. 

 

We must have a place...where children can have a whole group of adults they can trust.

Margaret Mead

Change:   Some Myths

Even when we know the current situation needs to be addressed, where do we go for new ideas and new directions. 

It is tempting to turn to the past for solutions.  If only we could turn back the clock and recreate things as they were before.  Nostalgia is rarely a good recipe for change.  While we look back to an earlier era think we see a rosy picture, nostalgia for the past often blinds us to significant problems with "the good old days."  The concept of change comes with its baggage of flawed assumptions.  Myths about change, which often have an element of truth about them, can be appealing.  But when adhered to without thought, myths stymie efforts to implement significant change. 

Myth #1:  Every situation is unique.  Some use this argument to dismiss methods successfully adopted elsewhere.  Every situation has unique attributes and special characteristics, but that doesn't mean that every reform effort has to be a totally new, custom-designed plan. Reasonable solutions, developed by others, already exist. Reform, to be effective, does not need to be original.  It simply needs to be appropriate and recognized as valuable by all the players.

Myth #2:  Significant change has to be directed by leaders or it won't happen. Discussion about new approaches takes time and can stir up emotions.   But everyone knows that airing ideas makes it easier to accept changes later on.   Ignoring the opinions of the people affected by change is counterproductive, whether in a family, business or organization.  Change is a complex process and succeeds when everyone participates. 

Myth #3:  Change requires unanimous agreement by everyone affected.  We can all think of situations in which we agreed with the overall goals of a proposal but had concerns about some of the specifics.  Sometimes we need to set aside reservations over details to ensure the overall objective is achieved.   Significant change does not require unanimity.  it requires leadership and vision...sometimes from just a few...even, sometimes, beginning with a single person.

Myth #4:  It is harder to implement change in our traditional practices.  Change takes place when new information becomes available and when members of a community decide that traditional practices and policies are no longer acceptable.  Throwing up our hands and bemoaning the innate conservatism that exists is an easy excuse to try nothing. 

We are at a crossroads now and need to learn about and implement different practices.  We need to make sure we do not dismiss ideas because of mistaken notions about the change process. 

                                                                    Adapted from the New Professional

Page 3

It is essential that we enable young people to see themselves as participants in one of the most exciting eras in history and to have a sense of purpose in relation to it.

Nelson Rockefeller

Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs

The following hierarchy of needs is a widely used approach to liberty- and security-oriented rights.  Abraham Maslow of Brandeis University proposed that all humans share certain basic needs, which form a five-level hierarchy arranged in terms of importance to living:

1.  Physiological needs.  To survive, humans need food, clothing, shelter, and rest.  These are the most elemental needs.

2.  Safety or security needs.  Beyond immediate survival, humans start to look at stabilizing their environment for the future.  Human needs become safeguards against danger, threat, or deprivation.

3.  Social needs.  At the next level, humans want to be part of something larger than themselves.  They have social needs for belonging, along with sharing and receiving friendship and love. 

4.  Ego needs.  These self-esteem needs include independence, achievement, knowledge, status, and recognition.

5.  Self-fulfillment needs.  Finally, the need for growth and self-actualization develops.  Individuals want to realize their potential as productive membersers of society.  At this level, intellectual or religious freedom might be valued highly. 

At each level, needs determine values and behavior patterns.   For example, humans value food and shelter most highly at the first level, and their actions will focus on meeting these basic needs.  In addition, a higher level need only operates when lower level needs have been met.  After a need has been satisfied; however, it no longer motivates behavior.  Many of us are now focusing on Level 2. 

 

 

Concerns in Handling Change

Family members are more likely to support change efforts when these concerns are considered:

  • Information,  Describe the change with answers to questions such as:  "What is going to happen?" What does the change look like?"  and "What does it feel like?"

  • Personal.  The change is already doomed if this question isn't answered: "How will I fit in?"

  • Implementation.  When the first two concerns are answered, you will be ready for: "How do I get started on the change?"

  • Impact.  If you get this far, you can expect questions such as:  "How will the change benefit us?" or "What will be different?"

Adapted from Executive Excellence, Ken Blanchard

There is properly no history, only biography.

Ralph Waldo Emerson

Your Child Belongs

"This is my family; this is where I belong!"   Every child should be able to say these words.  When your child feels that he or she belongs, then he or she is better able to grow and develop to his or her fullest.   Children need to feel a sense of belonging in, ownership of, and loyalty to family.   This should be the goal of every family.  Here are some specific things that can be done to give your child a sense of belonging.

  • First and foremost plan for your child to feel safe and secure in the home environment. Seek ways to improve safety and stability without arousing inappropriate anxiety in your child.  When opportunities arise, have appropriate discussions with your child on your efforts to improve safety for him or her.

  • Plan for your child to meet with success in tasks in the home.  Children who are successful in tasks will have a greater sense of pride, a better self-concept, and an improved feeling of belonging. Provide increased encouragement and discuss with your child how he or she can work toward greater success in the tasks he or she performs.

  • Children's feelings of belonging are often couched in friendships and acceptance from peers.  Help your child by guiding the friendships and healthy relationships that provide opportunities for him or her to experience the feeling of belonging and having a place in the family community. 

 

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Most of us will never do great things, but we can do small things in a great way.

 

Fifteen Ways To Help Children Like Themselves

Reward children.  Give praise, recognition, a special privilege or increased responsibility for a job well done.  Emphasize the good things they do, not the bad.

  1. Take their ideas, emotions and feelings seriously.   Don't belittle them by saying, "you'll grow out of it" or "it's not as bad as you think."
  2. Define limits and rules clearly, and enforce them.   But do allow leeway for your children within these limits.
  3. Be a good role model.  Let your children know that you feel good about yourself.  Also let them see that you too can make mistakes and can learn from them.
  4. Teach your children how to deal with time and money.   Help them spend time wisely and budget their money carefully.
  5. Have reasonable expectations for your children.   Help them to se reasonable goals so they can achieve success.
  6. Help your children develop tolerance toward those with different values, backgrounds and norms.  Point out other people's strengths.
  7. Give your children responsibility.  They will feel useful and valued.
  8. Be reasonable.  Give support when children need it.
  9. Show them that what they do is important to you.   Talk with them about their activities and interests.  Go their games, parents' day at school, drama presentations, awards ceremonies.
  10. Express your values, but go beyond "do this" or I want you to do that."  Describe the experiences that determined your values, the decisions you made to accept certain beliefs, the reasons behind your feelings.
  11. Spend time together.  Share favorite activities.
  12. Discuss problems without placing blame or commenting on a child's character.  If children know that there is a problem but don't feel attacked, they are more likely to help look for a solution.
  13. Use phrases that build self-esteem, such as "Thank you for helping" or That was an excellent idea!"  Avoid phrases that hurt self-esteem, "Why are you so stupid?" "How many times have I told you?"
  14. Show how much you care about them.  Hug them.   Tell them they are terrific and that you love them.

Remember the Power of Praise!

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The most important product that America has been able to produce is not the automobile or television or the computer.  It is hope...hope not only for ourselves but for the world. .

Fantastic Fall Links!

Rice Romp:  You'll be surprised at all there is to know about rice!  The U.S. Rice Producers have created a site that teaches about rice in a game like structure.  Subjects covered include Mathematics, Social Studies, Science and Nutrition for grades 4 - 7.  Strategic Studies created much of the instructional content for the site.  The site uses flash animation to enhance the content.  http://www.riceromp.com

The Mighty m&m Math Project:  Ever wonder what is the percentage of each color in a single bag of m&m's? and, if the percentages of each color are similar worldwide? The Mighty m&m Math Project helps to answers these questions while teaching fractions and percentages in a motivating and yummy way. http://mighty-mm-math.caffeinated.org/main.htm

Bat Thematic Unit:  Use this site to get ideas for a thematic bat unit or find a fun Halloween activity for your elementary students. Sections cover basic
information, resources (web links, books, etc.), projects & activities, art, science, conservation, literature, environment, sports, and even a Bat Quiz. Be sure to try the BatQuest online activity. Even with some sections unfinished, there is still plenty to do at this site. Created by students of CSU Hayward's Educational Technology Leadership Graduate Program. http://www.cccoe.k12.ca.us/bats/

How To Eliminate The Ten Most Critical Internet Security Threats:  This highly technical article lists ten ways to help protect your network from hackers. You may not know how to implement these recommendations, but you can use them as a checklist when working with a network security expert. http://www.sans.org/topten.htm

ABC News 4 Kids: This site that uses multimedia technology to get to the heart of current events. New stories are added every Tuesday and Thursday, allowing kids to learn about diverse topics.
http://abcnews.go.com/abcnews4kids/kids/index.html

2001 Mars Odyssey:  Odyssey is an orbiter carrying science experiments designed to make global observations of Mars to improve our understanding of the planet's climate and geologic history, including the search for water and evidence of life-sustaining environments. The mission will extend for more than a full Martian year (two-and-a-half Earth years).
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/odyssey/mission/moi.html

The History Net:  As people look at what's going on in the world today, they may feel the need to dig a little deeper than the immediate story that they see on TV.  This site is basically US history as seen through its wars and conflicts. You can read about American Expeditionary Force in World War I or the aeronauts of the Civil War. Tales of bravery and treachery, espionage and subterfuge.  We still cling to the hope that some day war will be relegated to Web sites such as this and history books.
http://www.thehistorynet.com/

Enjoy this beautiful Month!

From the Staff at Strategic Studies Corporation

 
Copyright © 2001 Strategic Studies Corp.
http://www.strategicstudies.com