November 2001 Vol. 4.9    
http://www.strategicstudies.com
 ..
President's
Message


When Obstacles Get You Down

Double Your Brain Power

"F" Doesn't Mean "Panic"

Our Time in History - A Paradox

Family Time

Great November Links!

Top of Page

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

President's
Message


When Obstacles Get You Down

Double Your Brain Power

"F" Doesn't Mean "Panic"

Our Time in History - A Paradox

Family Time

Great November Links!

Top of Page

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

President's
Message


When Obstacles Get You Down

Double Your Brain Power

"F" Doesn't Mean "Panic"

Our Time in History - A Paradox

Family Time

Great November Links!

Top of Page

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

President's
Message


When Obstacles Get You Down

Double Your Brain Power

"F" Doesn't Mean "Panic"

Our Time in History - A Paradox

Family Time

Great November Links!

Top of Page

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

President's
Message


When Obstacles Get You Down

Double Your Brain Power

"F" Doesn't Mean "Panic"

Our Time in History - A Paradox

Family Time

Great November Links!

Top of Page

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

President's
Message


When Obstacles Get You Down

Double Your Brain Power

"F" Doesn't Mean "Panic"

Our Time in History - A Paradox

Family Time

Great November Links!

Top of Page

President’s Message

FallBicycle.gif (18154 bytes)It has been an unusually, warm Fall in this part of the world.  It seems to match the feeling of uneasiness that so many of us continue to feel.  Everything is different this year even the weather.  On my afternoon walks I am especially aware of the sounds and sights around me.  The trees, so bare now, waiting for the onslaught of winter.  Squirrels scampering about continuing to gather what they can find that remains of discarded seeds and nuts.  The leaves are almost all cleaned up now.  Shadows are long as the sun sits low in the sky.   Sounds carry further as there are no rake.gif (2626 bytes)leaves to break the sound.  The hammering of building, the rush of the commuter train a mile away, and the airplanes.  I often find myself looking at them as they seem to hang in the sky and then move slowly on to their destination.  I pull my sweater tighter around me as the sun sinks and the cooler night air begins to take over.  It seems we are all just waiting. 

The first Thanksgiving ever proclaimed by a President of the pilgrim.gif (6867 bytes)United States was observed on November 26, 1789.  It was proclaimed by President Washington as a day of gratitude for the adoption of the Constitution.  This will likely be a special Thanksgiving for many people.  In this season of thankfulness, I am especially appreciative  for a way of life that, despite all its faults, has given this country the best the world can devise.  And, I give special thanks for your support and encouragement.  Best wishes for a joyous Thanksgiving holiday!
Visit  Knowledge HQ to find information you can use for learning and teaching.  This edition focuses on Heroes.  Links and ideas create a basis for an interesting study.     
More New Lessons at e-Tutor:

Primary

  • Coming To Your Senses

Intermediate

  • Traveling Geese
  • Seasons of the Snow Goose
  • California Rice
  • The Role of Texas in U.S. Rice Farming

Middle/Junior High

  • The Price of Rice I
  • The Price of Rice II
  • The Economics of Rice
  • Rice in Arkansas                                                                                                                              

New lessons are added on a regular basis.

Page 2

A people without the knowledge of their past history, origin, and culture is like a tree without roots.

Marcus Garvey

When Obstacles Get You Down

Positive thoughts and actions lower stress.  But here's how they also boost your efficiency:

  • Keep your sunny side up.  When mishaps occur, react with optimism.  Find a silver lining and emphasize it. 
  • Set an example.   Do for others.  When others see your actions, they'll be uplifted and will strive to mirror your behavior.  Result:  Even as things seem harder, those around you will seek opportunities to give to others so that they can enjoy the same emotional rewards you do.
  • Find humor in sadness.   If you can maintain sohappygirl.gif (5562 bytes)me levity even when you are besieged by crises or struck by tragedy, you become more resilient.  Appropriate humor will help you stop moping so that you can focus on positive action instead.

Adapted from Psychology Today

 

There can be hope only for a society which acts as one big family, and not as many separate ones.

Anwar al-Sadat

Double Your Brain Power

You probably sometimes wish that you could think faster, grasp new information quicker and recall more of what you read and hear.  You can, with these tips:

  • Tackle information you want to commit to your short-term memory in the morning.  Reason:  The brain section that stores short-term memory items performs about 15% better in the morning.  But switch to the afternoon for items you want to keep in your long-term memory because that part of your memory bank hits its stride later in the day.
  • "Reverse and rephrase" to overcome negative thoughts about your ability to learn something new.  Example:   Instead of "I won't remember what I'm learning,"  tell your brain "I have already learned to recall many things...names, dates, computer commands.   So I can and will remember this."
  • Plan for an upcoming learning event by selecting a reward you will give yourself afterward.  Pick something you wouldn't usually buy or do.  Picture yourself enjoying the reward just before the learning event starts.  Repeat the process whenever you feel anxious about learning the information.  Note:  No matter how things turn out, give yourself the reward.
  • Answer these questions after you read something that you want to remember: What was it about?  What parts of it were most important?  What  opinions, if adoublehelix.gif (3026 bytes)ny, did it contain?  What's my opinion of it?  What element makes it unique?  Note:   Do this mentally or in writing...whichever works best for you.
  • Rely on graphic devices to increase your reading speed and to help you zero in on the main points in books and other publications.   Examples:  italics, boldface, underlining, bulleted lists, charts, graphs, etc.  As you go through pages, ignore regular text and scan only for these devices.  When you find one, slow down and read those sections more carefully.
  • Boost your thinking power by taking the time to really think about the answers to these questions about a situation, some information or a problem:  What seems to be the key idea here?  Does this resemble or parallel anything I have already learned or experienced?  Do I still have a nagging question about any part of this?  When I put everything together, what do I see as most important?

Jean Marie Stine,  Double Your Brain Power: Increase Your Memory by Using All of Your Brain All the Time

Page 3

There are only two lasting bequests we can hope to give our children.  One of these is roots; the other, wings.

Hodding Carter

ReadReport.gif (1274 bytes)"F" Doesn't Mean "Panic"

It may be difficult to suppress your anger, but a child who receives a failing grade needs his parents' support more than ever.  Let your child know you will help him identify what went wrong and will work with him to master the material which he is finding difficult.  Remind him that failures, like successes, go hand-in-hand with the learning process.  Expressing a nonchalant attitude by saying, "Oh well, try to do better next time,"  or making excuses for the poor grade by asserting, "I was never any good at math either" can be as bad as overreacting.  A "ho hum" approach reinforces the child's feeling that he is doomed to perpetual failure. 

While it is too late to improve grades already recorded, there are ways parents can help children succeed in the next marking term.  ReportCard.gif (3802 bytes)

  • Uncover the "real" problem.   Rule out any underlying reasons for your child's failing grade, such as the need for glasses, hearing problems, a learning disability or problems with friends.  Look for signs of substance use, particularly if you see a drastic change in performance.   Then have a heart-to-heart talk with your child to pinpoint difficulties such as:   disorganization about assignments, lack of understanding of material, failure to complete homework, poor confidence, fear of tests or lack of interest.  Getting to the bottom of the problem is the first step in correcting it.
  • Meet with the teacher. A conference with the teacher should answer your questions about exactly what problems your child must overcome in order to bring that "F" up to a satisfactory grade, or better.  Specific knowledge about your child's strengths and weaknesses can help to target areas which need special attention.  Also find out if your child has been placed in a group which is beyond her abilities.  Enlist the teacher's support:   Ask if he or she can provide weekly progress reports.
  • Map a strategy for success.   Work with the teacher to outline a plan to bring your child's grade up to par.   This might involve a set homework routine every night with no exceptions, the elimination of television, telephone and extracurricular privileges until grades improve, a notebook to organize all tests and assignments, and help from you whenever he needs it.   Let your child know that if he is willing to put in the time and effort, he can get a better grade.
  • Consider other options.   If your child is still lagging behind in a subject despite the efforts of you and her teacher, you could go a step further.  This might mean remedial classes, summer school, an after-scabout_us.jpg (4508 bytes)hool tutor, online instructional support, like e-Tutor, or, in some cases, counseling to improve classroom behavior or motivation.  By keeping on top of your child's progress, you will know if these additional measures are necessary.
  • Never give up. Don't dwell on the failure.  Discuss it with your child, then put it behind both of you.   Remind her of recent successes, such as her detailed science project, her progress in gymnastics or her helpfulness around the house.  Remember:  You can rekindle her confidence.  Just because she failed math, she is not a failure.

 

Preschool Reading Lessons

PreschoolRead.gif (4163 bytes)Preschoolers can be taught to read, and some parents buy special lessons for them.  Most experts, however, warn against this.  Too much pressure at a young age may teach a child that reading is a chore.  Furthermore, reading is not an important skill, in itself, for a preschooler to know.  Children at this age learn more from activities...from doing things...than from reading.

The main advantage of early reading skill is simply that it makes first grade easier.  That may be reason enough to help children learn to pronounce letters and words before the first day of school.  But children who cannot read at age six are not "behind."  Children can "catch up" in reading ability very fast.

Should you teach a preschooler to read?  So long as it doesn't interfere with active learning, and so long as it is fun, the answer is "go ahead."  Just remember that the best teaching method is your own example.

There are those, I know, who will reply that the liberation of humanity, the freedom of man and mind is nothing but a dream.  They are right.  It is the American dream.

Franklin D. Roosevelt

Our Time in History - A Paradox

  • We have taller buildings, but shorter tempers; wider freeways, but narrower viewpoints.

  • mansion.gif (5582 bytes)We spend more, but have less; we buy more, but enjoy it less.

  • We have bigger houses and smaller families; more conveniences but less time.

  • We have more degrees, but less sense; more knowledge but less judgement.diploma.gif (2268 bytes)

  • We have more experts, but more problems; more medicine but less wellness.

  • We have multiplied our possessions, but reduced our values.

  • We talk too much, love too seldom and hate too often.

  • We've learned how to make a lavish living but not a life.

  • We've added years to life but not life to years.

  • We've been all the way to the moon and back but haverocket.gif (3649 bytes) trouble crossing the street to meet the new neighbor.

  • We've conquered outer space but not inner space.

  • We've cleared up the air but polluted our soul.

  • We've split the atom but not our prejudice.

  • We have higher incomes and lower morals.

  • We've become long on quantity but short on quality.

These are the times of world peace but domestic warfare; more leisure but less fun, more food but less nutrition.  These are the times of tall men and short character; steep profits and shallow relationships.   These are the days of two incomes but more divorce; of fancier houses but broken homes.  It is a time when there is much in the show window and nothing in the stockroom; a time when technology can bring you this letter instantly and a time when you can choose to make a difference...or just hit delete. ComputerUnplugged.gif (5153 bytes)

Reflections from a Columbine Student

 

Page 4

enews2.gif (1931 bytes)

Happiness is not a state to arrive at, but a manner of traveling.  

Margaret Lee Runbeck

FamilySing.gif (4607 bytes)Family Time

Emotional bonds among people, whether kin or friends, take time to develop.  They grow out of spending time together and learning more about one another.  Doing things together as a family can continuously enhance the feelings of support among family members.

While doing things as a family group is valuable, spending time with individual family members is also important.  In two-parent families, parents need to spend time together to renew their relationship.  Single parents need to spend time away from their children and to enjoy the company of other adults.  This can be especially important, but hard to accomplish, when children are very young.

Children also benefit from one-to-one interaction with a parent, sibling, or other adult.  Although it can be fun to do things as a family, individuals can also benefit from developing special relationships.ParentChildSwing.gif (25975 bytes)

Just as a lack of affection and togetherness can be detrimental, so can too much.  Healthy families spend quality time together but also allow individual family member's privacy and time to pursue independent interests and relationships.

Families with young children typically spend more time together because of the needs of younger children.  In families with teenagers, children often want to spend more time with their friends than with their family.   This is a normal aspect of growing up and can be a vital part of the adolescent's development into adulthood.  Similarly, young children, compared to teenagers, tend to be more receptive to the overt hugs, kisses, and praises of their parents.  It is important to remember, however, that people of all ages need to be loved and appreciated.   Consequently, it is important to be sensitive to the needs and wishes of each family member and to develop ways of expressing supportive and affectionate feelings.

Remember the Power of Praise!

Page 5

enews2.gif (1931 bytes)

When I look at the future, it's so bright, it burns my eyes.

Oprah Winfrey

LeavesNuts.gif (3715 bytes)

Great November  Links!

Plimoth Plantation Museum:  The staff at this museum has collected a wealth of information about the Pilgrims and their first Thanksgiving.                                      http://plimoth.org/Library/Thanksgiving/thanksgi.htm

Thanksgiving Fun:  For families, Thanksgiving means creating memories for the children.  This site is a great place for ideas.                          http://www.childfun.com/themes/thanks.shtml

Cleopatra in Chicago:  An exhibit at Chicago's Field Museum takes an in-depth look at "Cleopatra of Egypt: From History to Myth." http://www.fieldmuseum.org/cleopatra/cleopatra.html

Space Kids: This is a science web site that offers rich, compelling, entertaining, and educational content for everyone, from astronauts to educators to kids. 
http://www.spacekids.com

FirstGov for Kids:  This site is the U.S. government interagency kids' portal.  It provides links to federal kids' sites, along with some of the best kids' sites from other organizations.
http://www.kids.gov

Activist Kids:  The power of kids is celebrated at this site.  The purpose is to document the value of young people working with teachers and other adults on projects "that combine powerful learning with public purpose."
http://www.whatkidscando.org

Happy Thanksgiving!turkeypumpkin.gif (5942 bytes)

From the Staff at Strategic Studies Corporation

 
Copyright 2001 Strategic Studies Corp.
http://www.strategicstudies.com